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Stories, updates, insights, and original analysis from The Planetary Society.

The best seat in the solar system

Look at some extraordinary views from space and imagine what you’d see if you had the best seat on SpaceX’s Dragon capsule.

Sketching a science meeting

The Planetary Society has always enjoyed the connections between science and art, so when I saw Leila Qışın's sketches pop up on her Twitter feed during the recent New Horizons team meeting, I knew I had to share them with you.

#DPS17: Wobbling the Moon and art by James Tuttle Keane

James Tuttle Keane is increasingly famous (among planetary scientists anyway) for his remarkable illustrated notes from conferences. Here's his work from the Division for Planetary Sciences meeting, illustrating both his own and others' research.

Saturn's Ring Particles

Artist and astrophotographer Judy Schmidt brings us a view from within the rings of Saturn.

The Sea That Has Become Known

Artist Porter McDonald describes his latest painting, Mare Cognitum, which features NASA's Ranger 7 spacecraft.

The Art of Planetary Science

On October 17-19, 2014, the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory on the University of Arizona campus hosted the second annual Art of Planetary Science exhibition. This exhibition featured works of art inspired by the solar system, alongside works by scientists created from their scientific data.

Creating Life on a Gas Giant

Adolf Schaller, an artist on the original Cosmos series, shares his experience of creating the painting,

Watch the recording of my Google+ Science Hour with guest Dan Durda

On June 6 I hosted the Cosmoquest Weekly Science Hour. My guest was Dan Durda of the Southwest Research Institute. We talked asteroids, impact mitigation, searches for Vulcanoids, and suborbital experiments, and then he took us through how he creates his digital space art.

A brush painting for Hayabusa

Upon James Aldridge's return from Japan, he posted several albums worth of amazing photos, including several of their calligraphy instructor, well-known artist Aiko Tanaka, creating a gestural brush painting to commemorate Hayabusa's return.

What planet is THIS?

Check out this watery world! It's clearly a computer simulation of something, but of what? Can you guess?

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