Author

All

Keyword

All

Stories, updates, insights, and original analysis from The Planetary Society.

Say hello to Saturn and bon voyage to Perseverance

With 3 spacecraft en route to Mars, we’re sharing mission news, Martian maps, and a chance to meet Bill Nye.

The Next 10 Years

Six scientists share the major planetary science discoveries of the past decade, and the questions that will drive the next 10 years of solar system exploration.

The Solar System According to Carolyn Porco

The leader of the Cassini spacecraft imaging team discusses pale blue dots, life on Enceladus, terraforming Mars, Pluto, Carl Sagan, and more.

Voyager Wide-Angle Views of Jupiter

Last month marked the 40th anniversary of the historic Voyager 1 encounter with Jupiter in 1979.

NASA Then & Now

A collection of before and after slider images showing how views of planets in our solar system have changed over the years since NASA was created.

How long is a day on Saturn?

One of the Cassini mission's goals was to figure out how long a day on Saturn is. We still don't know. A new paper reports a measurement of the rotation period of Saturn that is different from past measurements.

A new storm on Saturn!

On March 29, vigilant astronomer Maciel Bassani Sparrenberger discovered that a new bright spot had broken out in Saturn's high northern latitudes.

How the Falcon Heavy could revolutionize exploration of the ocean worlds

SpaceX's Falcon Heavy is not just for big payloads, it can also throw light things into space very fast. And that has significant implications for the exploration of distant destinations in our outer solar system—particularly the ocean moons of the giant planets.

Cassini’s Last Dance With Saturn: The Farewell Mosaic

Amateur image processor Ian Regan shares the story of processing Cassini's final images of the ringed planet.

Fall 2017 issue of The Planetary Report now available

The Fall 2017 issue of The Planetary Report is in the mail and available online now to our members!

Cassini: The dying of the light

Cassini is no more. At 10:31 according to its own clock, its thrusters could no longer hold its radio antenna pointed at Earth, and it turned away. A minute later, it vaporized in Saturn’s atmosphere. Its atoms are part of Saturn now.

Voyager 40th anniversary: Revisiting the Voyagers' planetary views

Björn Jónsson argues that even now, 40 years after Voyager 1 and 2 were launched, a lot of the data they returned is still of high interest.

Cassini's 'Grand Finale' Portrait of Saturn

Amateur image processor Ian Regan shares a stunning mosaic of Saturn in all its ringed glory.

Saturn and Titan in the Milky Way

An unusual photo of Saturn by astrophotographer Damian Peach shows the planet and its largest moon nestled among the star-filled lane of the Milky Way.

Trusty Cassini survives first dive between Saturn and its rings

Cheers erupted in the Von Karman auditorium at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory early Thursday morning as a squiggly green line on a graph developed a crisp, tall peak, signifying that the Cassini spacecraft was calling home after surviving its first plunge between Saturn and its ring system.

This weekend, it's the beginning of the end for Cassini

NASA's long-lived Cassini spacecraft is about to buzz Titan for the final time, putting it on course for a spectacular mission finale that concludes in September.

Another smoking gun in the search for life in Enceladus’ ocean

NASA's Cassini spacecraft sniffed out molecular hydrogen spewing from Enceladus' subsurface ocean. The discovery means Saturn's moon has all the basic ingredients needed to support life.

Cassini, with only a half-year to go at Saturn, just keeps dropping awesome images

Our latest roundup of Cassini goodies from Saturn includes Pan, a ravioli-shaped moon that orbits inside the planet's ring system.

Did Voyager 1 capture an image of Enceladus' plumes erupting?

Amateur image processor Ted Stryk revisited Voyager 1 data of Enceladus and came across a surprise.

Saturn's Ring Particles

Artist and astrophotographer Judy Schmidt brings us a view from within the rings of Saturn.

12 ... 7 >

Space is vast. There's a lot of exploring to do.

You can increase discoveries in the worlds of our solar system and beyond. When you join The Planetary Society, you help build public support for planetary science, encourage decision makers to prioritize human and robotic exploration, and support technological advances in planetary exploration.

Become A Member