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Stories, updates, insights, and original analysis from The Planetary Society.

Our Commitment to Work Against Racism

Many of us are having a hard time looking up right now. It’s a painful moment. We here at The Planetary Society recognize we must do more to support Black people, including Black people who love space.

Our Responsibility to Deal more Kindly with One Another

Planetary Society CEO Bill Nye shares how the Society is responding to the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19) around the world.

Reaching Higher for Space

We humans have always looked to the night sky and pondered our place in the cosmos.

Before the State of the Union, a chance to talk science

Before the State of the Union address, Bill Nye and Planetary Society staff met with sixteen sitting members of Congress. At each meeting they had the opportunity to talk about the importance of space exploration and scientific research.

Bill Nye's top eclipse tip: Protect your eyes

Bill Nye, CEO of The Planetary Society, has some suggestions for staying safe during next week's solar eclipse.

A letter from Bill Nye: Why we're marching for science

The Planetary Society is joining the March for Science. Bill Nye is serving as an honorary co-chair, and our organization is an official partner. Here's why we're marching, and how to join us.

Tonight I Glimpsed LightSail

Tonight, for the first time, I glimpsed our spacecraft with my own eyes. It was just the faintest pinprick against the bright lights of the big city. But, there it was right on time and exactly per the coordinates.

We could find life on another planet, but do we have the will?

Are we alone in the universe? This month’s National Geographic cover story takes a look at the question, and I weighed in on the subject.

Making the Rounds on Capitol Hill

There's an old saying about Washington, D.C.: it’s a small town, based on relationships. We are establishing very good relationships with members of the U.S. Congress and the Administration. Three of us made the rounds recently, going from one Congressional Member’s office to another to support planetary exploration and a mission to Europa. Our team included Casey Dreier, our Director of Advocacy; Bill Adkins, our lobbyist in Washington; and me.

That time I took a selfie with Neil Tyson and the President of the United States

Last week, my fellow Board Member Neil deGrasse Tyson and I were invited to be presenters at the first edition of the White House Film Festival. Neil asked the President if we could take a selfie with him. In those few moments, the President, Neil, and I spoke about science and space exploration.

An Open Letter to President Barack Obama

Bill Nye writes President Obama arguing that the President should embrace a bold future of planetary exploration.

The Goal is Mars

Today, The Planetary Society submitted our white paper to the National Research Council's call for

The White House Science Fair and an Earful for Bolden

I meet the future of science in the United States, and I speak directly to NASA Administrator Charles Bolden about my concerns for Planetary Science funding.

Bad Budget News for NASA's Planetary Exploration Program

The Administration just released its proposed budget for 2014 and it contains some very bad news for NASA's planetary exploration program. Just three weeks ago the U.S. Congress rejected similar cuts proposed for planetary exploration last year. It was a clear statement of support by both Congress and the public: planetary exploration is an affordable national priority.

A Major Political Victory for The Planetary Society

The Planetary Society just achieved a major victory in our efforts to ensure strong funding for NASA’s planetary exploration.

Washington Update

Bill Nye and Neil deGrasse Tyson spoke to the House Science committee about the importance of space and scientific research. Bill Nye also visited with Congressman Culberson and Congressman Wolf's chief of staffabout supporting NASA's Planetary Science Program.

Name That Asteroid!

OSIRIS-REx is will return a piece of the ancient asteroid 1999 RQ36, and it's up to you to come up with a name.

Neil Armstrong changed the world

Neil Armstrong changed the world. He was an excellent engineer and an outstanding pilot. He got the assignment to land a completely novel rocket machine on the Earth’s Moon, because he was the perfect man for the job: He could really fly; he had excellent judgment about the capabilities of his ship; and above all, he had a remarkable ability to keep his wits about him in extraordinarily dangerous situations.

Curiosity's Marsdial is on Mars!

Following the successful landing of the Curiosity rover, it is gratifying indeed to see the third MarsDial© photometric calibration (cal) target on the planet Mars. It is something near and dear to me personally, and it's good for all of us, because it helps us do good science.

Ray Bradbury, a friend of The Planetary Society

Thank you Ray; you changed the world. At the Planetary Society we will do our best to see to it that your dreams and hopes of exploring the distant regions of the Solar System, Mars especially, and are kept alive.

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Space is vast. There's a lot of exploring to do.

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