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Stories, updates, insights, and original analysis from The Planetary Society.

Red hot space

This week’s roundup of space news and exploration inspiration will leave you seeing red (in the best way possible).

By Jove! (Literally)

Jupiter’s moons have always been exciting to explore, and a new era of Jovian moon research is about to begin.

Meet the snow worlds

Earth isn't the only planet with snow. From Io to Enceladus, here's where snow can be found in our solar system.

Why are there no stars in most space images?

Look up at space at night from a dark location and you can see innumerable stars. Why, then, do photos of so many things in space show black space, devoid of stars?

#LPSC2018: Groovy Galilean satellites

The Jovian system is a busy place. The Groovy Galilean Satellites session at last week's Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC) covered analysis of past mission data, testable hypotheses for future missions, and discussion of the use of ground-based data.

#MoonMon: Io's pretty plumes

On this Moon Monday, I'm featuring an animation processed by Gordan Ugarkovic, showing Jupiter's volcanic moon Io with its prominent plumes.

Juno's instruments return riches from first perijove

On August 27, Juno soared across Jupiter's cloud tops from pole to pole, with all instruments operating. NASA posted some terrific first results from several of the instruments today. And the JunoCam team released all 28 raw images taken during the close encounter.

Will Juno’s Instruments Observe the Moons of Jupiter?

It is not easy to observe Jupiter’s moons as more than points of light with Juno, because Juno will never get very close to any of the moons, but as its orbit shifts there will be opportunities to collect data on some of the moons.

Juno has arrived!

For a second time, NASA has placed a spacecraft into orbit at Jupiter. The spacecraft operated exactly according to plan, and Juno successfully entered orbit today, July 5, 2016, UTC

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