Where did we come from? Are we alone in the Universe? We can only answer these questions by exploring the planets and other worlds of our solar system and beyond. Learn why these worlds are so important, and how you can get involved.

Mercury, Planet of Extremes

Mercury can teach us how planets form and what the early solar system was like when life arose on Earth.

Venus, Cloudy With A Chance of Life

Venus may have had oceans and been habitable to life before being transformed into an inhospitable wasteland.

Earth

Earth is our home and the only world known so far to harbor life.

The Moon, Preserving Earth's Origin Story

The Moon is the only world besides Earth ever visited by humans. By studying it, scientists can piece together Earth’s origin story.

Mars, the Red Planet

Mars once had liquid water on the surface and could have supported life. We don't know how it changed to the cold, dry desert-world it is today.

Asteroids, Comets, and Other Small Worlds

These leftover planet-building materials are time capsules that give us a peek into our origins.

Jupiter, the Planet with a Solar System of Its Own

Jupiter, our largest planet, teaches us how solar systems evolve. Its four planet-like moons make it a solar system of its own.

Saturn, Planet of Rings, Moons, and More to Explore

Saturn is the crown jewel of our solar system. It has a stunning set of rings, diverse moons, and so much more to explore.

Uranus, the Sideways Planet

Uranus may be the butt of all planet jokes, but there's much more to this world than potty humor.

Neptune, Planet of Wind and Ice

Neptune, our outermost planet, is a windy blue world with exotic ice, raging storms, rings, and a moon that could have a subsurface ocean.

Exoplanets, Worlds Orbiting Other Stars

We know of more than 4,000 planets orbiting other stars. Does one of them host life as we know it?

A Pale Blue Dot

Look again at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us.

Latest Articles

Spirit Ventures Out to First Target

Spirit ventured out yesterday, driving nearly 10 feet (about 3 meters) to its first target -- a football-sized rock that scientists have dubbed Adirondack. Meanwhile, Spirit's twin, Opportunity, successfully completed its first trajectory correction maneuver (TCM) in four months.

Spirit Extends Arm and Takes First Close-Up Images of Martian Soil

Spirit has extended her robotic arm for the first time to examine a patch of fine-grained Martian soil, and joined forces with the European Space Agency's Mars Express to successfully conduct the first-ever, international, coordinated observation of the planet's atmosphere.

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