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Updates on Shoemaker NEO Grant Recipients (18 March 2010)

Bruce Betts • March 18, 2010

Our past Shoemaker NEO grant recipients have once again shown themselves to be a hardworking and enterprising group.

Propose for a Shoemaker Near Earth Object Grant

Emily Lakdawalla • March 17, 2010

Are you a serious amateur astronomer who enjoys the challenge of following up on the discoveries of faint near-Earth objects?

WISE has found its first comet, P/2010 B2 (WISE)

Emily Lakdawalla • February 08, 2010

Having discovered its first asteroid on January 12, Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has now officially discovered its first comet, P/2010 B2 (WISE).

Apophis is less scary than it used to be

Bruce Betts • October 07, 2009

Based on analyses of previously unstudied telescopic data, NASA scientists have released new predictions for the path of the 300-meter-diameter asteroid Apophis.

Grant Winners at the 2009 Planetary Defense Conference

Bruce Betts • May 05, 2009

A few days ago I had the honor of announcing the latest winners of The Planetary Society's Gene Shoemaker NEO grants here at the Planetary Defense Conference in Granada.

More from the Planetary Defense Conference: Shoemaker Grant Winners

Bruce Betts • April 27, 2009

More from the Planetary Defense Conference: Shoemaker Grant Winners

Updates on the 2007 Shoemaker NEO Grant Recipients (27 April 2009)

Bruce Betts • April 27, 2009

Our 2007 Shoemaker NEO Grant winners have been extremely busy over the past two years. Take for example Quanzhi Ye of Guangzhou, China: He was only 18 when he received the award but already the principal investigator of the sky survey at the Lulin Observatory in Taiwan.

Updates on the 2007 Shoemaker NEO Grant Recipients (27 June 2008)

Bruce Betts • June 27, 2008

Amateur astronomers play a critical role in retiring the risk of impact from near-Earth objects. When the Shoemaker NEO Grant program began in 1997, the focus was on finding previously undiscovered objects one kilometer in diameter and larger. Thanks to professional NEO survey programs like LINEAR (the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research program run by MIT’s Lincoln Laboratories) and the Catalina Sky Survey (run from the University of Arizona’s Lunar and Planetary Laboratory), the goal of discovering the vast majority of large NEOs is within reach, and the focus of the Shoemaker NEO Grant Program has shifted to astrometric follow-up and physical studies.

Updates from Past Recipients of the Shoemaker NEO Grants (1 March 2007)

Bruce Betts • March 01, 2007

Thanks to The Planetary Society Shoemaker Grant, the 1.06-meter KLENOT telescope optics was completed at the Klet Observatory. Regular observations of the KLENOT project started in March 2002 under the new IAU/MPC code 246, so we can now present results covering 5 years of this work.

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