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Stories, updates, insights, and original analysis from The Planetary Society.

Curiosity update, sols 521-533: Assessing Dingo Gap

While continuing to perform regular wheel health assessments, Curiosity took a sharp right turn and headed for Dingo Gap. On sol 533, they performed a

Curiosity update, sols 488-520: Steady driving while watching the wheels

In the last month, Curiosity put 222 meters on the odometer in 12 short drives, while regularly assessing the wheels for damage. The rover performed touch-and-go analyses of rocks including Oneida and Kodak, and also took some ChemCam RMI mosaics of rocks near the base of Mount Sharp.

Curiosity update, sols 465-487: Wheel inspection, software upgrade, Cumberland dump

Curiosity activities over sols 465 to 487 included monitoring the condition of the wheels; a flight software upgrade; and dumping the Cumberland drill sample. Curiosity put approximately 200 meters on the odometer during this period.

Curiosity update, sols 453-464: Electrical problem causes delays; rover back to work

An electrical problem frustrated progress on the Curiosity mission this week, but the problem is now understood and the rover back to work.

Curiosity Update: A stop at Cooperstown and a warm reset, sols 433-451

Having racked up several kilometers in the drive to Mount Sharp, Curiosity paused for a second science stop at an outcrop called

Curiosity update: Roving through the shutdown toward Waypoint 2, sols 388-432

After a brief science stop at Darwin (formerly known as Waypoint 1), Curiosity has driven hundreds of meters toward Mount Sharp. Autumn has come to Curiosity's southern hemisphere location, bringing lower temperatures. That means more power is required to heat rover actuators, leaving less power for science along the drive.

Curiosity update: AutoNav toward Mount Sharp, sols 373-383

From sols 373 to 383 (August 23 to September 3, 2013), Curiosity traveled about 250 meters toward Mount Sharp over five drives, trying out her new AutoNav capability.

Updates on Curiosity from Ken Herkenhoff: Embarking for Mount Sharp (sols 326-372)

United States Geological Survey scientist Ken Herkenhoff posts regular updates on the Curiosity science team's plans for the rover on Mars.

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