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More Issues

Feature: Exoplanets

2 March 2020

Your Guide to Exoplanets

Learn why and how we study exoplanets, and how you can get involved.

2 March 2020

Our Exoplanets Research

Scientists are searching for 100 Earth-like planets around other stars, and you can help.

Swapna Krishna ● 12 March 2020

What is the Habitable Zone?

The habitable zone is the not-too-hot, not-too-cold region around a star where liquid water can exist.

Emily Lakdawalla ● 2 March 2020

The Different Kinds of Exoplanets
You Meet in the Milky Way

Lava worlds. Hot Jupiters. Earth 2.0 candidates. Here's a rundown of some notable exoplanets.

Emily Lakdawalla & Staff ● 2 March 2020

How to Search for Exoplanets

Some methods almost sound like science fiction: Using gravity as a magnifying glass, watching stars wobble at turtle-like speeds, and searching for tiny dips in starlight.

2 March 2020

Your guide to WFIRST

WFIRST, NASA's Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope, is the next step in our hunt for Earth-sized exoplanets.

Blogs & Articles

Planetary Society Advent Calendar for December 19: Eros

Emily Lakdawalla • December 19, 2009

Not quite ten years ago, the Near Earth Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft arrived at the near-Earth asteroid Eros. NEAR accomplished many firsts.

Planetary Society Advent Calendar for December 18: Neptune

Emily Lakdawalla • December 18, 2009

Here's Neptune, but not quite like you've ever seen it before.

Cassini VIMS sees the long-awaited glint off a Titan lake

Emily Lakdawalla • December 17, 2009

The Cassini mission announced today the first observation of a specular reflection off of a lake on Titan. A specular reflection is a mirror-like flash, and you only get one when you have a mirror-like surface -- very, very smooth.

Planetary Society Advent Calendar for December 17: Proteus

Emily Lakdawalla • December 17, 2009

Proteus is a weird name for this world. It's the second-largest moon of Neptune, and so it's named (as are all of Neptune's moons) for deities associated with the sea.

Watch that front wheel spin!

Emily Lakdawalla • December 17, 2009

Holy cow, look at that right front wheel spin. I am alternately amazed and horrified by this animation.

Hayabusa on the home stretch

Emily Lakdawalla • December 17, 2009

Hayabusa is still 100 million kilometers from the Earth, less than an astronomical unit away but still with months to travel. But according to an update posted to their websitethis morning by project manager Junichiro Kawaguchi, Hayabusa is on the home stretch.

Planetary Society Advent Calendar for December 16: Mimas

Emily Lakdawalla • December 16, 2009

Mimas is the anti-Enceladus.

Two cool discoveries today: icy-hot exoplanet and smallest ever Kuiper Belt object

Emily Lakdawalla • December 16, 2009

There are two cool stories circulating today on the theme of discovering new places in the cosmos.

Downloading the "How to work with Mars Express VMC images" class

Emily Lakdawalla • December 16, 2009

Here's the information on how to watch the class on how to work with Mars Express VMC images, which I conducted to a small audience this morning.

Class announcement: How to play with Mars Express VMC images

Emily Lakdawalla • December 15, 2009

Those of you who follow me on Twitter know that I've been fiddling with images from the Mars Webcam, more officially known as the Mars Express Visual Monitoring Camera (VMC), for the last couple of weeks.

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