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More Issues

Feature: Exoplanets

2 March 2020

Your Guide to Exoplanets

Learn why and how we study exoplanets, and how you can get involved.

2 March 2020

Our Exoplanets Research

Scientists are searching for 100 Earth-like planets around other stars, and you can help.

Swapna Krishna ● 12 March 2020

What is the Habitable Zone?

The habitable zone is the not-too-hot, not-too-cold region around a star where liquid water can exist.

Emily Lakdawalla ● 2 March 2020

The Different Kinds of Exoplanets
You Meet in the Milky Way

Lava worlds. Hot Jupiters. Earth 2.0 candidates. Here's a rundown of some notable exoplanets.

Emily Lakdawalla & Staff ● 2 March 2020

How to Search for Exoplanets

Some methods almost sound like science fiction: Using gravity as a magnifying glass, watching stars wobble at turtle-like speeds, and searching for tiny dips in starlight.

2 March 2020

Your guide to WFIRST

WFIRST, NASA's Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope, is the next step in our hunt for Earth-sized exoplanets.

Blogs & Articles

Imaging the Earth from Lunar orbit

Cees Bassa and Tammo Jan Dijkema • October 15, 2018

Radio amateurs around the world worked together to take an image of the Earth and the far side of the Moon.

NASA Then & Now

Bruce Betts • October 02, 2018 • 2

A collection of before and after slider images showing how views of planets in our solar system have changed over the years since NASA was created.

Favorite Astro Plots: The Pyroxene Quadrilateral

Melissa Lane • June 15, 2018

Petrology is a field of science in which scientists study the compositions of rocks and minerals and interpret their geologic history. A common graph petrologists use is the “pyroxene quadrilateral.” These graphs, like photos of space, can reveal an understanding of the remotest parts of the solar system.

Big news from the magnetosphere

Geoffrey Reeves • June 05, 2018

At five years and counting, the Van Allen Probes mission continues to reshape our thinking about how Earth’s radiation belts flex and reconfigure under the influence of solar storms.

The curious case of the Apollo 4 Earth images

Jason Davis • May 23, 2018 • 2

Revisiting images of Earth taken from the uncrewed Apollo 4 command module in 1967.

#LPSC2018: What the Moon's craters tell us about Earth's past climate

Sriparna Saha • April 08, 2018

You might be surprised to learn that studying craters on the Moon can tell us about ancient Earth.

#LPSC2018: Fungi in the lab, hot springs frozen cold, and exploding lakes

Emily Lakdawalla • March 29, 2018

The first astrobiology session at last week's Lunar and Planetary Science Conference featured talks on a huge variety of interesting topics, and was one of my favorite sessions at the meeting.

Throwback Thursday Funpost! A spacewalk in deep space

Jason Davis • March 08, 2018 • 6

Only three humans have ever been on a spacewalk in the void between the Earth and Moon.

Go for GOLD, SES-14!

Heather Hunter • February 22, 2018 • 1

While we can measure properties of these upper layers using ground-based instruments, satellite-borne remote sensing instruments can give us a more frequent, global, and often higher spatial resolution perspective. And that is precisely what NASA’s Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk (GOLD) mission will deliver.

Bill Nye and people
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