Planetary Radio • Jan 06, 2015

The Exciting Year Ahead on the Final Frontier

On This Episode

Betts bruce headshot 9980 print

Bruce Betts

Chief Scientist / LightSail Program Manager for The Planetary Society

Jrd thumb newest

Jason Davis

Editorial Director for The Planetary Society

Casey dreier tps mars

Casey Dreier

Chief Advocate & Senior Space Policy Adviser for The Planetary Society

20170726 Twitteravatar Isabel Lawrence 50 Hi Res

Emily Lakdawalla

Solar System Specialist for The Planetary Society

20190611 bill nye profile cropped

Bill Nye

Chief Executive Officer for The Planetary Society

The Planetary Society’s experts look forward to a great year of firsts in the solar system and beyond. Bill Nye the Science Guy provides a status report on the Asteroid Redirect Mission. We also talk about robotic exploration with Emily Lakdawalla, human spaceflight with Jason Davis, and the outlook for space program funding with Casey Dreier. Bruce Betts and Mat Kaplan begin the What’s Up segment with a preview of even more 2015 efforts.

Dawn in LAMO at Ceres
Dawn in LAMO at Ceres Artist’s concept of Dawn in LAMO, pointing its scientific instruments at Ceres. NASA / JPL-Caltech
iTelescope.net
iTelescope.net

This week's question:

Besides Galileo (the man, not the spacecraft) who was the first person to discover a moon circling another planet? (Not Earth’s moon, but you might earn extra points if you tell us who discovered that moon, too. Also, a Nobel prize.)

To submit your answer:

Complete the contest entry form at http://planetary.org/radiocontest or write to us at planetaryradio@planetary.org no later than Tuesday, January 13, 2015 at 8am Pacific Time. Be sure to include your name and mailing address.

Last week's question:

How many rockets carried humans into orbit in 2014?

Answer:

The answer will be revealed next week.

Question from the week before:

Of spacecraft that have visited at least one giant planet (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune) which spacecraft had the greatest dry mass?

Answer:

Cassini is, by far, the largest spacecraft that has visited a giant, outer solar system planet.