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Finally, an official statement on UARS' exact reentry time and location

Emily Lakdawalla • September 27, 2011

The world watched on Friday as the derelict spacecraft named UARS made its final few orbits around Earth. And then we waited for final word of its reentry location. And waited. And waited.

Earth science's next big thing

Jason Davis • September 22, 2011

Meet the next big thing in NASA's mission to study planet Earth: NPP, the NPOESS Preparatory Project satellite.

Keeping track of UARS' reentry

Emily Lakdawalla • September 21, 2011

Unless you've been living under a rock you've probably heard that a very large Earth-orbiting satellite is going to be reentering Earth's atmosphere soon, and there's a small but nonzero chance of debris coming down where somebody might actually find it.

Congratulations to Russia on the launch of Spektr-R (RadioAstron)

Louis D. Friedman • July 18, 2011

Good news from Russia today: after 20 years of development they have finally launched their RadioAstron satellite (the official name is Spektr-R) into a high elliptical orbit around Earth.

India's launch site as seen by Japan's Daichi orbiter, now lost

Emily Lakdawalla • April 25, 2011

I wrote the following blog entry about an image from Japan's Daichi Earth-observing orbiter last week as one to keep in my back pocket for a day when I was too busy to write, not anticipating that there'd soon be a more pressing reason to write about Daichi. On April 21, after just over five years of orbital operations, Daichi unexpectedly fell silent, and is probably lost forever.

Glory Lost - But Its Mission Must Go On

Charlene Anderson • March 04, 2011

Another painful loss to NASA's mission to study Earth from space: Today a Taurus XL rocket failed to lift the Glory satellite into Earth orbit when its clam-shell nosecone refused to open, forcing the rocket and its payload into the southern Pacific Ocean.

Radar topographic view of a volcano

Emily Lakdawalla • January 17, 2011

Quick -- where is this? Is it one of Venus' iconic volcanoes? Or maybe Mars'?

Saturn's hexagon is not unique

Emily Lakdawalla • June 29, 2010

It turns out that Saturn's not the only place that displays geometrical shapes in its atmosphere. Earth does too.

A Martian Moment in Time, revisited

Emily Lakdawalla • May 12, 2010

A good start to my day today: The New York Times' Lens Blog featured the "Martian Moment in Time" photo that Opportunity took last week in a really nice writeup. I'm so grateful, and still a little surprised, that the folks on the Mars Exploration Rover mission took this idea and ran with it!

What's your favorite planet?

Charlene Anderson • March 02, 2010

Before you answer, check out these images!

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