The Planetary Society Releases Official Statement on the Launch of Perseverance

Press Statement
30 Jul 2020

Contact
Danielle Gunn
Email: danielle.gunn@planetary.org
Phone: +1-626-793-5100

The Planetary Society Releases Official Statement on the Launch of Perseverance
“These are trying times, but we remain capable of great things.”

Pasadena, CA (July 30, 2020) — The Planetary Society, the world’s largest independent space interest organization, issued the following statements praising the launch of the Perseverance mission:

Today saw the start of a new mission of exploration to the Red Planet. The Planetary Society congratulates the thousands of people around the United States and the world who made it happen.

The rocket and the rover were built here, on Earth. It challenged thousands of people here, on Earth, to work together and enable this mission of peaceful exploration. And in the midst of a global pandemic, it gave people here, on Earth, a reminder of how we can persevere against the odds. These are trying times, but human curiosity is persistent—we remain capable of great things.

The Perseverance rover is an affordable, high-priority scientific mission. But it is only the start of an unprecedented campaign to return carefully-curated samples of the Martian surface back to Earth. We will work to ensure NASA and its international partners have the support and resources to achieve this grand effort.

Bill Nye, Chief Executive Officer of The Planetary Society, added:

Once on the surface, the Perseverance spacecraft will take extraordinary pictures, study the stories that each Mars rock tells, and even listen to the wind. We’ll learn more about Mars, which helps us understand Earth and the cosmos. The mission is underway because of the focus and dedication of the engineers and scientists who managed to launch it toward another world while there’s a historic pandemic here on this one. Perseverance indeed. Let’s go!

Press Resources

Interviews with The Planetary Society's planetary scientists, space policy experts, and leadership are available upon request. Please arrange with Danielle Gunn, chief communications officer, at danielle.gunn@planetary.org.

We invite you to use content from our website to support your storytelling. We appreciate credit and links back to us when appropriate:

The Cost of Perseverance, in Context

The cost of the Perseverance rover disappears into the noise of U.S. spending and represents a more modest investment than you might think.

The Planetary Society's Guide to NASA's Perseverance Rover

NASA's Perseverance rover will seek signs of life in Jezero crater, and store samples for future return to Earth.

The Planetary Society's Guide to Mars Sample Return

Despite advances in space technology, certain science questions, including whether or not a Mars rock contains signs of ancient life, can only be answered in Earth-based laboratories.

Our New Map of Every Mars Landing Attempt, Ever

The Planetary Society has a new improved guide to all the places we've landed—or crashed—on Mars, plus planned locations for the upcoming Perseverance, Tianwen-1, and Rosalind Franklin rover missions.

Pictures of Mars

A collection of images and infographics of Mars, many not found elsewhere, from our Bruce Murray Space Image Library.

Audio interview: How Perseverance will Search for Life on Mars

Join the mission’s deputy project scientist as the Perseverance rover prepares to search for life on the Red Planet.

About The Planetary Society

The Planetary Society has inspired millions of people to explore other worlds and seek other life. With the mission to empower the world's citizens to advance space science and exploration, its international membership makes the non-governmental Planetary Society the largest space interest group in the world. Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded The Planetary Society in 1980. Bill Nye, a longtime member of The Planetary Society's Board, serves as CEO.

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