Planetary Radio • Jan 24, 2017

Ice, Snow and Lava: Exploring Antarctica’s Mount Erebus

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On This Episode

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Rosaly Lopes

Senior Research Scientist/Manager for Planetary Science for Jet Propulsion Laboratory

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Michael Carroll

Astronomical Artist

20140527 eugene cernan thumbnail

Eugene Cernan

Apollo 17 Commander for NASA

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Laura Danly

Astrophysicist and Curator for Griffith Observatory

Earth’s southernmost active volcano may also be its most remote. Rosaly Lopes and Michael Carroll recently spent a few frigid days on the slopes of Antarctica’s Mount Erebus. What they learned may help us understand volcanoes on other worlds. Emily Lakdawalla shows us stunning new, close-up images of Saturn’s rings. Bill Nye says a LightSail solar sail prototype has gone on display in a London museum. How could black holes help answer a space trivia contest question about Earth and Saturn? Also, an encore presentation of a visit with the late Gene Cernan, last astronaut to walk on the moon.

Mount Erebus, Antarctica
Mount Erebus, Antarctica Evan Miller
Mt. Erebus ice cave
Mt. Erebus ice cave Evan Miller
Lower Mount Erebus, Antarctica
Lower Mount Erebus, Antarctica Michael Carroll / Rosaly Lopes
Mount Erebus Caldera, Antarctica
Mount Erebus Caldera, Antarctica Michael Carroll / Rosaly Lopes
Rosaly Lopes with the WINGS WorldQuest flag
Rosaly Lopes with the WINGS WorldQuest flag Michael Carroll / Rosaly Lopes
At Mount Erebus, Antarctica
At Mount Erebus, Antarctica Michael Carroll / Rosaly Lopes
Michael Carroll in an Antarctic cave
Michael Carroll in an Antarctic cave Michael Carroll / Rosaly Lopes
Antarctic ice towers
Antarctic ice towers Michael Carroll / Rosaly Lopes
Tents on Fang Glacier
Tents on Fang Glacier Michael Carroll / Rosaly Lopes
Mount Erebus crater, Antarctica
Mount Erebus crater, Antarctica Michael Carroll / Rosaly Lopes
iTelescope.net
iTelescope.net

This week's question:

What solar system moon is closest in size to Mercury?

To submit your answer:

Complete the contest entry form at http://planetary.org/radiocontest or write to us at [email protected] no later than Tuesday, January 31st at 8am Pacific Time. Be sure to include your name and mailing address.

Last week's question:

Approximately how wide is the combined, complex caldera of Olympus Mons, the Martian volcano?

Answer:

The answer will be revealed next week.

Question from the week before:

Approximately how many squished-up Earths would fit inside Saturn?

Answer:

You could squish about 764 Earths into a hollowed-out Saturn. Ah, but how many Earth mass black holes? Answer is in the show.

How to prepare 764 Earths to fill Saturn
How to prepare 764 Earths to fill Saturn Daniel Hazard