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Looking at Io's Volcanoes Since Galileo

Jason Perry • October 18, 2018

It’s been almost 17 years since NASA's Galileo spacecraft took meaningful data of Jupiter’s volcanic moon.

Moon Monday: Galileo's Galileans

Emily Lakdawalla • April 02, 2018 • 1

This week it seems fitting to feature a portrait of the Galilean moons by Galileo.

#LPSC2018: Groovy Galilean satellites

Harriet Brettle • March 30, 2018 • 1

The Jovian system is a busy place. The Groovy Galilean Satellites session at last week's Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC) covered analysis of past mission data, testable hypotheses for future missions, and discussion of the use of ground-based data.

#MoonMon: Io's pretty plumes

Emily Lakdawalla • March 26, 2018

On this Moon Monday, I'm featuring an animation processed by Gordan Ugarkovic, showing Jupiter's volcanic moon Io with its prominent plumes.

Brief note from #AGU17: Juno observes volcanism on Io

Emily Lakdawalla • December 13, 2017

At the American Geophysical Union meeting, members of the Juno team showed observations of active volcanism on Jupiter's moon Io.

Explore spinnable Saturn and Jupiter moons with Google Maps

Emily Lakdawalla • October 27, 2017 • 2

Google Maps released several new map products that allow you to see the locations of named features on many solar system planets and non-planets, spinning them around in space with your mouse.

Voyager 40th anniversary: The transformation of the solar system

Ted Stryk • August 23, 2017 • 2

The Voyager missions transformed most of the large worlds of the solar system from points of light into places to be explored.

Juno's instruments return riches from first perijove

Emily Lakdawalla • September 02, 2016 • 3

On August 27, Juno soared across Jupiter's cloud tops from pole to pole, with all instruments operating. NASA posted some terrific first results from several of the instruments today. And the JunoCam team released all 28 raw images taken during the close encounter.

Will Juno’s Instruments Observe the Moons of Jupiter?

Candice Hansen • August 30, 2016 • 2

It is not easy to observe Jupiter’s moons as more than points of light with Juno, because Juno will never get very close to any of the moons, but as its orbit shifts there will be opportunities to collect data on some of the moons.

Juno has arrived!

Emily Lakdawalla • July 05, 2016 • 7

For a second time, NASA has placed a spacecraft into orbit at Jupiter. The spacecraft operated exactly according to plan, and Juno successfully entered orbit today, July 5, 2016, UTC

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