Cassini RADAR swath on Titan, flyby T16, July 22, 2006

Cassini RADAR swath on Titan, flyby T16, July 22, 2006
Cassini RADAR swath on Titan, flyby T16, July 22, 2006 This swath is about 6,600 kilometers (4,129 miles) long, subtending over 200 degrees of longitude and 55 degrees of latitude on Titan. It begins at 20 degrees north, 142 west, with a 75-kilometer-diameter circular feature that could be an impact crater or a volcano. From there it swings northward. At about 70 degrees north, the black spots of the putative methane lakes begin to appear. The center of the swath is near the north pole. The extreme right end is at 13 degrees north, 347 degrees west, and covers some of the now-familiar longitudinal sand dunes. The swath is shown here at a resolution of 32 pixels per degree (1.4 kilometers or 4,600 feet per pixel), a quarter of the full resolution at which the image was released. NASA / JPL-Caltech

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