Planetary Radio • Apr 26, 2017

Bill Nye Saves the World…With Space

On This Episode

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Bill Nye

Chief Executive Officer for The Planetary Society

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Jason Davis

Editorial Director for The Planetary Society

It was a big week for the Science Guy, and for science. Bill Nye served as honorary co-chair of the March for Science in Washington DC. His new Netflix series, Bill Nye Saves the World, premiered the next day, Friday, April 21st. Two of the show’s thirteen episodes are devoted to space science and exploration. Bill talks about all this in a special conversation with Mat Kaplan. Planetary Society Senior Editor Jason Davis marks the beginning of the end for the Cassini mission at Saturn. While Bruce Betts and Mat are fresh out of rubber asteroids, there’s no shortage of Random Space Facts and cosmic comedy in What’s Up.

Marching for Science
Marching for Science Planetary Society CEO Bill Nye joined marchers at the March for Science in Washington, D.C. on 22 April 2017. Navid Baraty / The Planetary Society
Attendees at the March for Science in Washington, D.C., April 22nd, 2017
Attendees at the March for Science in Washington, D.C., April 22nd, 2017 Navid Baraty / The Planetary Society
Planetary Society CEO Bill Nye gives a speech at the March for Science in Washington, D.C., April 22nd, 2017
Planetary Society CEO Bill Nye gives a speech at the March for Science in Washington, D.C., April 22nd, 2017 Navid Baraty / The Planetary Society
Planetary Society members and volunteers gather before the March for Science in Washington, D.C., April 22nd, 2017
Planetary Society members and volunteers gather before the March for Science in Washington, D.C., April 22nd, 2017 Navid Baraty / The Planetary Society
Planetary Society CEO Bill Nye joins marchers at the March for Science in Washington, D.C., April 22nd, 2017 (wide)
Planetary Society CEO Bill Nye joins marchers at the March for Science in Washington, D.C., April 22nd, 2017 (wide) Navid Baraty / The Planetary Society

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This week's prizes are a Planetary Radio t-shirt, now available in both men’s and women’s styles, and a 200-point iTelescope.net astronomy account.

iTelescope.net
iTelescope.net

This week's question:

What letter is used to classify the most powerful class of solar flares, as observed from near Earth in X-rays? (Using the most popular system now in use.)

To submit your answer:

Complete the contest entry form at http://planetary.org/radiocontest or write to us at planetaryradio@planetary.org no later than Wednesday, May 3rd at 8am Pacific Time. Be sure to include your name and mailing address.

Last week's question:

Within 100 or so, how many CONFIRMED exoplanets have been discovered?

Answer:

The answer will be revealed next week.

Question from the week before:

How many moons in our solar system are larger than Pluto?

Answer:

Seven moons in our solar system are larger than Pluto…so far.