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The August 20, 2010 Jupiter fireball -- and the March 5, 1979 one

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2010/08/24 11:36 CDT

Following up on the story I first posted on August 22, the Jupiter impact fireball first noticed by Japanese amateur astronomer Masayuki Tachikawa has been independently confirmed by two other Japanese astronomers.

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Yet another Jupiter impact!? August 20, seen from Japan

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2010/08/22 05:03 CDT

This may be a very common event after all: another optical flash has been observed on Jupiter, again from an observer far east of the Greenwich meridian, though it was not Anthony Wesley (for once).

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New Horizons images Jupiter again

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2010/07/27 06:30 CDT

Three years after New Horizons flew past Jupiter on its way to Pluto, the spacecraft has imaged the giant planet again.

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Jupiter's faded belt: It's happened before, and it'll happen again

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2010/06/16 05:07 CDT

When I wrote a post about Jupiter's missing South Equatorial Belt in May, I had three main questions: how long did it take for the belt to go away, has this happened before, and how can a planet as big as Jupiter change its appearance so quickly?

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The June 3 Jupiter Impact: 22 hours later

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2010/06/04 01:14 CDT

Time to take stock of what happened a day ago. The worldwide, round-the-clock nature of planetary science is both exhilarating and challenging!

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Confirmation of the Jupiter impact from Christopher Go

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2010/06/03 07:51 CDT | 1 comments

The impact flash on Jupiter observed earlier today by Anthony Wesley has been confirmed by Philippines-based amateur astronomer Christopher Go.

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A NEW! Impact on Jupiter

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2010/06/03 05:51 CDT

On the same day as a team of astronomers released new Hubble Space Telescope images of last year's Jupiter impact, the original discoverer of the 2009 impact scar, Anthony Wesley, reported on an amateur astronomy forum that he had observed a new impact on Jupiter.

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Jupiter has lost a belt!

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2010/05/10 05:22 CDT

Via Daniel Fischer's Tweet about a blog entry by Astro BobI learned of something which should be obvious to anyone who has trained even a rather small telescope on Jupiter over the past few weeks: one of its iconic stripes is just plain gone.

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Hubble turns 20

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2010/04/23 03:02 CDT

Tomorrow is the 20th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope. It's hard to believe it's been going strong for so many years.

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Where neon falls like rain

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2010/03/22 05:00 CDT

As if Titan's methane rain weren't weird enough, Jupiter's now thought to have helium-neon rain.

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400 Years of the Galilean Satellites

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2010/01/07 03:34 CST

It was 400 years ago today that Galileo discovered smaller planets attending the planet Jupiter.

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Planetary Society Advent Calendar for December 7: Jupiter

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2009/12/07 03:11 CST

Jupiter has been high overhead at sunset for several months, a brilliant light that's easy to spot even when the sky is still bright at dusk; but it's now moving quickly to the west as Earth speeds ahead of Jupiter's more stately march around the Sun.

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Four hundred and fourteen years since Galileo

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2009/12/07 10:43 CST

Galileo, the scientist, discovered the Galilean satellites of Jupiter four hundred years ago next month, while Galileo, the mission, arrived at Jupiter to study those moons in situ fourteen years ago Sunday.

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Two new names in the solar system: Herse and Weywot

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2009/11/12 04:45 CST

Via the USGS I learned that Jupiter has passed a milestone of sorts, and now has fifty named satellites.

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Planetary Radio Q and A: Not-so-gassy giants

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2009/11/04 04:02 CST

On Planetary Radio's "Questions and Answers" I answered this question: "I read that Uranus got its tilt when it was hit by another object. What does it mean for a ball of gas to be hit -- wouldn't another object just pass through it?"

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Frame a Pluto portrait

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2008/04/07 01:27 CDT

As New Horizons continues its journey (it's now approaching the orbital distance of Saturn, though it's very far from that planet in space), the mission is taking advantage of the recent experience with the Jupiter flyby to plan out the science operations for the Pluto-Charon encounter.

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New Horizons' Jupiter flyby was successful!

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2007/02/28 09:14 CST

According to a press release issued minutes ago, New Horizons has successfully completed its close flyby of Jupiter.

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New Horizons update and a website roundup

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2007/02/03 07:33 CST

I've just posted a very detailed timeline of New Horizons' encounter with Jupiter -- take a look!

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New Horizons Jupiter Encounter Timeline

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2007/01/31 07:00 CST

A year after its launch on January 19, 2006, New Horizons is fast closing in on Jupiter, the first target on its near decade-long journey. On February 28 the spacecraft will approach to within 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) of Jupiter before speeding along on to its way to the edge of the solar system.

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New Horizons' raw images are now online

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2007/01/23 04:58 CST

I got an email from John Spencer this morning telling me that the mission had posted all of New Horizons' most recently acquired images on the mission website.

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