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An Amazing Evening for Planetary Defense

Mat Kaplan • April 23, 2013

Bill Nye, Bruce Betts, Mat Kaplan, Meteorite Man Geoffrey Notkin and stars of planetary science at the Planetary Defense Conference public event in Flagstaff.

LPSC 2013: The Smaller They Are, The Better They Shake

Emily Lakdawalla • March 25, 2013

Really cool movies from Jim Richardson propose to explain how the same physics of impact cratering can produce such differently-appearing surfaces as those of the Moon, large asteroids like Eros, and teeny ones like Itokawa.

Beautiful butterfly crater on Mars (another HiWish granted!)

Emily Lakdawalla • November 08, 2012

I asked Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to take a photo, and it turned out better than I had imagined: an incredibly fresh, well-preserved, dramatically rayed oblique impact crater.

More Evidence for Impact Origin for Colombia’s Vichada Structure

Bruce Betts • May 08, 2012

Evidence continues to pile up that the Rio Vichada structure in Colombia is indeed the largest impact structure in South America.

Venus' very pretty craters

Emily Lakdawalla • March 05, 2012

Each Magellan images of Venus seems to be a work of abstract art.

Six days in the crater (day one)

Pat Donohue • February 03, 2012

This is the first in a series of posts based on field notes and memories supplemented by background reading material from the Meteor Crater Field Camp that was held from October 17-23, 2010.

Notes on Dawn at Vesta from the 2011 American Geophysical Union meeting

Emily Lakdawalla • December 08, 2011

A report on the press briefing and talks from the Fall 2011 American Geophyisical Union meeting about the data on Vesta collected so far by Dawn.

Mercury's Weird Terrain

Emily Lakdawalla • April 19, 2011

When Mariner 10 flew past Mercury, it caught an immense impact basin lying half in and half out of sunlight, which they named Caloris. Even with only half the basin visible, scientists knew it was one of the largest in the solar system. Geologists had to wait more than 25 years to see the rest of Caloris, and when they did it turned out to be even bigger than they had thought. But the fact that Caloris was only half in sunlight was fortuitous in one sense, because it meant that the spot on Mercury that was exactly opposite the area of the Caloris impact was also partially in sunlight. That spot looks weird.

LPSC 2011: Sponge-moon Hyperion

Mike Malaska • March 23, 2011

Saturn's moon Hyperion has a bizarre sponge-like appearance that is in dramatic contrast to other heavily cratered bodies in the solar system.

LPSC 2011: Kirby Runyon on Mars, the Moon, Hartley 2, and Ganymede

Kirby Runyon • March 15, 2011

Kirby Runyon, a second-year grad student at Temple University, offered to send me some writeups of selected presentations from last week's Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, and I enthusiastically agreed.

Butterfly crater on Mars

Emily Lakdawalla • January 27, 2011

I've spent the day noodling around in the current issue of Icarus, following up some of the more interesting stories within its table of contents, and came across a picture of this very cool crater -- actually, set of craters -- on Mars.

Door 26 in the 2010 advent calendar

Emily Lakdawalla • December 26, 2010

Time to open the twenty-sixth door in the advent calendar. Where in the solar system is this rayed crater?

Opportunity bags a few craters

Emily Lakdawalla • November 10, 2010

In the last few days, Opportunity's passed by several craters, and the rover drivers took advantage of the chance encounters for what they call "drive-by shooting" (a phrase I can't say I'm particularly fond of, but they didn't ask me).

LPSC, Day 2: Impacts onto icy moons

Emily Lakdawalla • March 03, 2010

There has been big news from Moon and Mars here at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, but I can't find the time to wrap that stuff up into a properly illustrated blog post; while I'm still on site at the conference I'll be tossing the easier-to-digest bits into the blog.

Planetary Society Researcher Max Rocca Discovers Largest Impact Crater in South America

Amir Alexander • February 13, 2010

It was January of 2004 when the elegant curve of the Vichada first caught the attention of geologist Max Rocca of Buenos Aires. Could the course of the river have been shaped by the circular outlines of an impact crater? Rocca decided to find out.

A pretty picture of Concepcion crater

Emily Lakdawalla • February 01, 2010

It looks like the rover team thinks Concepcion is pretty enough (in both aesthetic and a scientific senses) to be worthy of the full-color Pancam panorama treatment; color frames started arriving on Earth over the weekend.

Opportunity's thousand-year-old crater

Emily Lakdawalla • January 29, 2010

Since leaving Marquette Island on sol 2,122, Opportunity has been barreling southward on her journey toward Endeavour crater. On her horizon for the last several sols has been a very small but very fresh looking crater named Concepción.

The Martian Craters Asimov and Danielson

Ken Edgett • May 27, 2009

The Martian Craters Asimov and Danielson

LPSC: Thursday: Rovers, Titan, Mars, Venus Express, Neptune

Ted Stryk • March 14, 2008

I spent a large portion of the day at the Lunar and Planetary Institute's library and presented my own poster during the poster sessions, so my coverage of Thursday's sessions is limited.

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