Planetary Radio • Dec 13, 2016

A Giant Telescope and Remembering John Glenn

On This Episode

20141028 John Logsdon thumbnail

John M. Logsdon

Board of Directors of The Planetary Society; Professor Emeritus and founder, Space Policy Institute, The George Washington University

Space historian John Logsdon remembers American hero John Glenn. Planetary Society CEO Bill Nye was a big fan of the Friendship 7 astronaut—less so the new Star Wars movie. Then we get an update on the Giant Magellan Telescope from Patrick McCarthy. Emily Lakdawalla explains how a Martian breeze has made the Curiosity rover’s work more challenging. John Glenn is also the focus of this week’s space trivia contest.

John Glenn in his Friendship 7 capsule orbiting Earth
John Glenn in his Friendship 7 capsule orbiting Earth NASA
John Glenn relaxes aboard ship after becoming the first American to orbit the Earth
John Glenn relaxes aboard ship after becoming the first American to orbit the Earth NASA
Artist concept of the Giant Magellan Telescope
Artist concept of the Giant Magellan Telescope GMTO

Related Links:

This week's prizes are a lovely Planetary Radio t-shirt, now available in both men’s and women’s styles. Also, a 200-point iTelescope.net astronomy account, and a Planetary Society rubber asteroid.

iTelescope.net
iTelescope.net

This week's question:

What famous baseball player was John Glenn’s wingman in the Korean War?

To submit your answer:

Complete the contest entry form at http://planetary.org/radiocontest or write to us at [email protected] no later than Tuesday, December 20th at 8am Pacific Time. Be sure to include your name and mailing address.

Last week's question:

What did Apollo 17 Commander Gene Cernan, last person to walk on the moon, say just before he re-entered the Lunar Module to return to Earth?

Answer:

The answer will be revealed next week.

Question from the week before:

How many Soviet Venera spacecraft successfully landed on Venus? We’ll accept a fairly loose definition of success. (Within one or two.)

Answer:

Eight Venera spacecraft successfully landed on Venus, followed by two nearly identical Vega landers.