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Talking Climate With Bill Nye

Mat Kaplan • July 03, 2012

Talk about changing climates on this world and others brought 600 people to the Boulder Theater.

Not Necessarily Your Last Venus Transit!

Jim Bell • June 04, 2012

Unless you are lucky and healthy enough to live for another 105 years, tomorrow will be your last chance to see a Venus transit from the surface of the Earth. But this need not be the last transit of Venus that you will ever see.

Transit of Venus June 5: Why Should You Care and How to Observe

Bruce Betts • June 02, 2012

A rare astronomical event occurs June 5/6. Find out why you should care and how to observe it.

Some Details About Transits of Venus

David Shortt • May 22, 2012

The upcoming rare transit of Venus is one step in a long dance among Earth, Venus and the Sun. Transits of Venus follow a peculiar pattern—two transits 8 years apart, then 105.5 years with no transits, then two transits 8 years apart, then 121.5 years with no transits, for a total cycle of 243 years—and thereby hangs a tale.

Venus' very pretty craters

Emily Lakdawalla • March 05, 2012

Each Magellan images of Venus seems to be a work of abstract art.

Is there life on Venus? Not in reprocessed Venera-13 images.

Emily Lakdawalla • January 23, 2012

At the end of last week, a rather sensational article appeared in both the Russian- and English-language sites of the Russian news agency, RIA Novosti. "Life Spotted on Venus - Russian Scientist," ran the English headline; a Google translation of the Russian one goes: "The Soviet probes may have photographed creatures on Venus."

Russia's Venera-D mission (DPS-EPSC 2011)

Ted Stryk • October 05, 2011

During the afternoon poster session at the Division of Planetary Sciences / European Planetary Science Congress meeting, I had a long talk with Ludmila Zasova (IKI) about Russia's Venera-D mission to Venus.

Scale solar system presentation slide, a provisional version for you to review

Emily Lakdawalla • September 15, 2011

I'm preparing a talk for the Pacific Astronomy and Telescope Show here in Pasadena on Sunday afternoon at 1:45. I have spent the morning putting together a slide that I have long wanted to have for presentations.

Summer Sights of the Solar System

Ray Sanders • June 07, 2011

What can you expect to see if you look at the night sky this summer (2011)?

Memo to early risers: Look up!

Emily Lakdawalla • May 02, 2011

There is a traffic jam of planets on the eastern horizon in the early morning right now and for the next several weeks, a prize for those of you who have to rise before dawn.

The scale of our solar system

Emily Lakdawalla • May 02, 2011

Space.com has taken advantage of the infinitely scrollable nature of Web pages to produce a really cool infographic on the scales of orbital distances in the solar system.

365 Days of Astronomy Podcast: What's up in the second quarter of 2011

Emily Lakdawalla • April 07, 2011

Regular readers of this blog will find the content of today's 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast familiar, because it's an update on what the solar system exploration spacecraft are up to, based on my monthly "what's up" updates.

LPSC 2011: Day 3: Moon, Mars, and Venus

Ted Stryk • March 10, 2011

Wednesday morning included some interesting conversations. Notably, I spoke with Pamela Gay, who is responsible for the MoonZoo citizen science program and who is presently working on developing a site through which the public will be able to help search for potential Kuiper belt objects for the New Horizons mission to encounter after the Pluto flyby.

The Solar System from the Inside Out - and the Outside In

Emily Lakdawalla • February 18, 2011

Space probes grant us perspective, the ability to see our place within the vastness of the solar system. But opportunities to see all of the solar system's planets in one observation are rare. In fact, there's only been one opportunity on one mission to see the whole solar system at once, until now.

IKAROS: self-portrait with Venus; primary mission complete

Emily Lakdawalla • January 26, 2011

JAXA posted a report today stating that IKAROS "has completed its regular operations."

Two possible futures for Akatsuki

Emily Lakdawalla • January 05, 2011

There are two intriguing possibilities being discussed in the Japanese media for what to do with Akatsuki, a space probe in orbit near Venus with a fully functional, highly capable suite of cameras but a damaged main engine.

Door 23 in the 2010 advent calendar

Emily Lakdawalla • December 23, 2010

Time to open the twenty-third door in the advent calendar. Where in the solar system is this oozing wound?

Door 16 in the 2010 advent calendar

Emily Lakdawalla • December 16, 2010

Time to open the sixteenth door in the advent calendar. Where in the solar system is this widespread fan?

Come back, Venus.....

Emily Lakdawalla • December 09, 2010

This image is so, so beautiful, and so, so sad.

Akatsuki enters orbit at Venus today!

Emily Lakdawalla • December 06, 2010

In just a few hours, Venus will have a second orbiter. Japan's Akatsuki is due to start firing its orbit insertion engines on December 7.

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