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Mars conjunction today: Cool SOHO/SDO video

Emily Lakdawalla • February 04, 2011

Today Mars made its closest approach to the Sun -- as seen from Earth, that is. Why is this important?

Solar eclipses from space: Hinode and SDO

Emily Lakdawalla • January 06, 2011

Two spacecraft that keep their ever-watchful eyes on the Sun -- NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and JAXA's Hinode -- were doing their thing, when something large wandered past: the Moon.

A Martian Moment in Time, revisited

Emily Lakdawalla • May 12, 2010

A good start to my day today: The New York Times' Lens Blog featured the "Martian Moment in Time" photo that Opportunity took last week in a really nice writeup. I'm so grateful, and still a little surprised, that the folks on the Mars Exploration Rover mission took this idea and ran with it!

What it looks like when a CME explodes toward us

Emily Lakdawalla • April 14, 2010

The animation I posted yesterday, of a huge coronal mass ejection exploding away from the Sun, caused several people to ask if it could do Earth any harm.

Stellar explosion

Emily Lakdawalla • April 13, 2010

The Sun just spat out a huge coronal mass ejection, an event made visible by the watchful cameras on SOHO.

Strong geomagnetic storm today

Emily Lakdawalla • April 05, 2010

This morning I received a bulletin warning of a "strong" geomagnetic storm that began just over an hour ago.

Space weather affects everyday life on Earth

Emily Lakdawalla • April 04, 2007

According to a press release issued this morning by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the enormous solar flare that erupted on December 5 and 6 last year was accompanied by an intense radio burst that caused large numbers of Global Positioning System recivers to stop tracking the signal from the orbiting GPS satellites.

Voyager's Last View

Charlene Anderson • August 01, 2002

Home. Family. This will be Voyager's enduring legacy: It has changed forever the feelings raised by those words. Through its robotic eyes we have learned to see the solar system as our home. Through its portraits of the planets we know that they are part of our family. Apollo astronauts showed us a tiny Earth alone in the blackness of space. Now, with these images, Voyager has shown us that Earth is not really alone. Around our parent Sun orbit sibling worlds, companions as we travel through the Galaxy.

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