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Atacama Diary for March 10, 2013--Pisco Sours and Liquid Helium

Mat Kaplan • March 10, 2013

Great dinner and great conversation with staff of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, topped by Chile's national drink.

Atacama Diary for March 8, 2013-Noon at LAX

Mat Kaplan • March 09, 2013

Another audio blog post, with excerpts from the National Science Foundation briefing on the ALMA Observatory, edited while I was waiting for my planet to Chile at LAX.

Planetary Society Hangout: March 7th, 2013 - What's Going On With Curiosity and a NASA Budget Update

Casey Dreier • March 07, 2013

Thursday at noon PST/3pm EST/20:00 UT we check in with Emily Lakdawalla to bring us up to speed with Curiosity's computer problems and we check in on NASA's budget status.

Atacama Diary for March 2, 2013--ALMA Explained

Mat Kaplan • March 02, 2013

The second in a series of audio blogs chronicling my trip to the driest spot on Earth, Chile's Atacama desert, to see the inauguration of the ALMA Observatory. Al Wootten and Alison Peck tell the story of ALMA.

Atacama Diary

Mat Kaplan • February 25, 2013

The first in a series of audio blogs chronicling my trip to the driest spot on Earth, Chile's Atacama desert, to see the inauguration of the ALMA Observatory.

Why don't we have any photos of asteroid 2012 DA14 if it came so close?

Emily Lakdawalla • February 19, 2013

A frequently-asked question last week was: if asteroid 2012 DA14 is coming so close to Earth, why hasn't anyone taken any pictures of it? Now that 2012 DA14 has whizzed past us, we do finally have some radar pictures of it, but they still may not satisfy everyone.

The Astronomy Budget Squeeze

Casey Dreier • January 09, 2013

It's not just the Planetary Sciences division within NASA that's under harsh budgetary times. The NSF Division of Astronomical Sciences is facing a choice between funding scientists and funding telescopes. A report from the 221st AAS meeting in Long Beach.

Asteroid 4179 Toutatis' upcoming encounters with Earth and Chang'E 2

Emily Lakdawalla • December 06, 2012

Near-Earth asteroid 4179 Toutatis will be passing within 7 million kilometers of Earth on December 12. Both radio telescopes and the Chang'E 2 spacecraft will be acquiring images.

The Arecibo Trip

Bill Nye • February 03, 2012

I have just returned from my first Planetary Society-sponsored trip to Puerto Rico and this historic, remarkable, big idea of a telescope.

The 70-meter dishes of the Deep Space Network

Emily Lakdawalla • November 28, 2011

I was inspired by my recent trip to Goldstone to put together this poster showing all three of the great 70-meter dishes of the Deep Space Network. There's one at each of the three complexes, at Goldstone, at Robledo (near Madrid, Spain), and at Tidbinbilla (near Canberra, Australia).

Our friendly neighborhood asteroid, 2005 YU55 (an animation)

Emily Lakdawalla • November 16, 2011

Last week JPL released two animations of asteroid 2005 YU55 made from the radar data acquired by Goldstone's 70-meter radio dish.

Goldstone: Desert outpost performs radio imaging of close-passing asteroid 2005 YU55

Emily Lakdawalla • November 09, 2011

Anticipating the close flyby of asteroid 2005 YU55 yesterday, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory invited media to tour Goldstone, one of three facilities that make up NASA's Deep Space Network. I've always wanted to see these massive radio dishes up close, so I jumped at the chance!

How radio telescopes get "images" of asteroids

Emily Lakdawalla • November 08, 2011

This is a repost of an article I wrote in April 2010; I thought it'd be useful reading for those of you interested in today's near-Earth flyby of asteroid 2005 YU55.

2010 JL33: How to see an asteroid from quite a long way away

Emily Lakdawalla • January 13, 2011

A terrific set of Goldstone radar images of a good-sized near-Earth asteroids named 2010 JL33 was posted to the JPL website yesterday. They also posted a movie version but something about these pixelated radar image series absolutely begs for them to be displayed as an old-school animated GIF, so I made one.

How radio telescopes get "images" of asteroids

Emily Lakdawalla • April 29, 2010

Every time I post a radio telescope image of a near-Earth asteroid, I get at least one reader question asking me to explain how radio telescopes take photos, so I'm hereby writing a post explaining the basics of how delay-Doppler imaging works.

Arecibo saves us from another potentially hazardous asteroid

Emily Lakdawalla • April 29, 2010

That's a bit of an overdramatic title, but it's true that the most efficient way for us to reduce the risk we face from asteroids that have a very small chance of hitting Earth in the future is to determine their orbits more precisely.

Goldstone detects "STRONG" radar echoes from 2010 AL30

Emily Lakdawalla • January 12, 2010

Radio scientist Lance Benner posted to the Minor Planets Mailing list this evening the following message: "We have detected STRONG radar echoes from 2010 AL30 at Goldstone."

Triple asteroid 1994 CC rotation animation

Emily Lakdawalla • August 06, 2009

From the "just plain cool" department. I love animations of planetary images and I love radar images of asteroids -- so this animation is doubly cool.

Europlanet : CoRoT - Preliminary Results

Doug Ellison • August 20, 2007

ESA's planet-hunting satellite COROT bagged its first exoplanet in observations of the star COROT-Exo-1.

No Icecaps at the Lunar Poles

Emily Lakdawalla • November 14, 2003

New observations reported this week in the journal Nature have cast doubt on the theory that thick deposits of ground ice lie conveniently close to the surface in permanently shadowed crater floors at the lunar poles.

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