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Frame a Pluto portrait

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2008/04/07 01:27 CDT

As New Horizons continues its journey (it's now approaching the orbital distance of Saturn, though it's very far from that planet in space), the mission is taking advantage of the recent experience with the Jupiter flyby to plan out the science operations for the Pluto-Charon encounter.

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Yet another active world: Charon

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2007/07/18 05:14 CDT

I've just posted a news story on a recently published paper that suggests that Pluto's moon Charon may have active ice volcanoes.

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Bedtime for New Horizons

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2007/06/28 06:07 CDT

According to the mission website, the New Horizons spacecraft has drifted off to sleep, entering its "hibernation" mode for the first time.

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New Horizons spots Pluto!

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2006/11/29 10:24 CST

Yesterday the New Horizons team released a flicker animation showing the spacecraft's first sight of Pluto, using the LORRI long-range imaging instrument.

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Suggestions for names of Pluto's moons

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2006/02/21 10:23 CST

I received quite a number of emails containing suggested names for Pluto's moons -- thanks! I just sent all the suggestions to Alan Stern; here they are for everybody's enjoyment.

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Speaking of Pluto...

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2006/02/20 07:31 CST

I just posted today's installment of Planetary Radio, in which Mat Kaplan gets an update on New Horizons from Principal Investigator Alan Stern-- check it out!

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Some more New Horizons stuff for you to read as the clock ticks down...

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2006/01/17 07:25 CST

Last night Amir Alexander posted a very thorough pre-launch news story on New Horizons, "New Horizons Set to Launch on 9 Year Voyage to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt." There are lots of details in there I haven't read anywhere else.

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(Almost) everything you ever wanted to know about New Horizons and Pluto

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2005/12/20 05:56 CST

I was browsing around the Web today looking for material to improve the information we have on our site about Pluto, and discovered that the New Horizons mission has just posted their launch press kit.

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An official pronouncement may be coming about the "what is a planet?" debate

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2005/09/21 02:28 CDT

Since the discovery of 2003 UB313, larger than Pluto, there's been a lively debate going on in many places about what makes a planet. There's now an article in Nature talking about a proposal that would address the controversy

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Pluto: The Discovery of a Planet

Posted by Amir Alexander on 2005/02/18 11:00 CST

To mark the 75th anniversary of the discovery of the planet Pluto, The Planetary Society presents to its readers the remarkable story of the discovery.

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The Discovery of a Planet, Part 6: From Pluto to Sedna

Posted by Amir Alexander on 2005/02/17 11:00 CST

74 years after Clyde Tombaugh discovered Pluto as a faint dot on a pair of photographic plates, a modern group of astronomers made another remarkable discovery. On March 15, 2004, Michael Brown of Caltech, Chad Trujillo of the Gemini Observatory, and David Rabinowitz of Yale announced the discovery of Sedna – the furthest object ever detected in the Solar System.

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The Discovery of a Planet, Part 5: The Aftermath

Posted by Amir Alexander on 2005/02/16 11:00 CST

The discovery of Planet X was announced to the world on March 13, 1930, which marked the anniversary of William Herschel’s discovery of Uranus in 1781 as well as Percival Lowell’s birthday. The observatory’s communiqué emphasized that the discovery was no coincidence, but the vindication of Lowell’s predictions made years before.

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The Discovery of a Planet, Part 4: Clyde's Search

Posted by Amir Alexander on 2005/02/15 11:00 CST

Since his teenage years Clyde Tombaugh had been an avid amateur astronomer and a gifted telescope builder. Based on instructions contained in an article from a boy’s Sunday school paper, he built a series of telescopes of increasing power and quality on the family farm.

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The Discovery of a Planet, Part 3: Planet X

Posted by Amir Alexander on 2005/02/14 11:00 CST

The discovery of Neptune accounted for nearly all the unexplained motions of the outer planets of the Solar System. Nevertheless, several astronomers insisted that some unexplained residual motions remained, pointing to the presence of a ninth planet beyond the orbit of Neptune.

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The Discovery of a Planet, Part 2: Out of the Six-Planet World

Posted by Amir Alexander on 2005/02/13 11:00 CST

Since humans first set their eyes to the stars, they noticed that a few of these bright objects behaved differently from the others. Whereas all the stars moved together, revolving around the Earth once every 24 hours, five appeared to move within the firmament among the other stars. Accordingly, they were named “planets,” meaning “wanderers” in Greek.

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The Discovery of a Planet, Part 1: The Blinking Image

Posted by Amir Alexander on 2005/02/12 11:00 CST

February 18, 1930, was a cloudy day at the Lowell Observatory, on top of Mars Hill in Flagstaff, Arizona. 22 year old Clyde Tombaugh was hard at work, peering through the lens of an ancient-looking brass-colored device. The instrument, known as a “blink comparator,” mounted two large photographic plates.

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