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Telescope Goes "Semi-Automatic"

Andrew Howard • October 20, 2006

Andrew Howard talks about the "semi-automated" nature of the observations from the Optical SETI telescope.

With Multi-Beam Receiver, SETI@home Takes Giant Step Forward

Amir Alexander • August 14, 2006

In seven intense days spent at the radio telescope Chief scientist Dan Werthimer and his colleagues completely overhauled the way SETI data is gathered at Arecibo, and ensured that SETI@home will henceforth enjoy the benefits of gathering data with the most advanced equipment anywhere in the world.

Updates from Past Recipients of the Shoemaker NEO Grants

Bruce Betts • July 18, 2006

Update as of July 13, 2006 Using the Shoemaker NEO Grant funds, Minor Planet Research has purchased a 1.7-terabyte data server for our Asteroid Discovery Station (ADS) education outreach program Through the generosity of Dr. Philip Christensen, this server is housed at the Mars Space Flight Facility (MSFF) at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona.

Telescope shows its Amazing Capabilities

Bruce Betts • July 11, 2006

During a few observation sessions in late April, the new Optical SETI Telescope was already demonstrating its amazing capabilities. Over three nights, the telescope completed 17 hours of observation, under the direction of Paul Horowitz and his team of Harvard graduate students. During that time, the telescope observed 1% of the sky, looking for the briefest flashes of light coming from outer space.

Searching for E.T. and the Cure for Cancer:The Planetary Society Helps Trigger a Computing Revolution

Charlene Anderson and Amir Alexander • July 07, 2006

Planetary Society members truly have helped pioneer new techniques in the conduct of science. Our initial investment has returned amazing results that will continue to deliver benefits over years to come.

The Planetary Society Optical SETI Telescope Opens

Bruce Betts • April 28, 2006

On April 11, 2006, a new era dawned in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) with the dedication and beginning of operations of The Planetary Society Optical SETI Telescope in Harvard, Massachusetts. It is the first devoted optical SETI telescope in the world. The telescope was constructed by Paul Horowitz and his group at Harvard University using funding from Planetary Society members.

Update: Getting Started

Louis D. Friedman • December 02, 2005

The Planetary Society solar sail team is working to try again to fly the world’s first solar sail spacecraft.

The Planetary Society and the Search for Extrasolar Planets

Amir Alexander • October 27, 2005

Almost since it was founded in 1980, The Planetary Society has been there for the search for other worlds.

The End of Cosmos 1, the Beginning of the Next Chapter

Louis D. Friedman • September 30, 2005

Cosmos 1 was—and is—a great effort, and one we are proud The Planetary Society tried to do. Our independent grassroots organization built and launched a spacecraft whose technology promises to one day open up interstellar travel.

Updates from Past Recipients of the Shoemaker NEO Grants

Bruce Betts • August 17, 2005

Update as of July 28, 2005 Following last year's Potentially Hazardous Asteroid and a few other non-main-belt discoveries, I looked into what improvements I could make to more efficiently image the sky. The major advance involved the design of a 3-lens corrector comprising 2 stock lenses and a custom lens I made myself.

Volna Failure Review Board Reports on Loss of Cosmos 1

Louis D. Friedman • July 20, 2005

The Volna Failure Review Board convened by the Makeev Rocket Design Bureau, manufacturers of the Volna launch vehicle, has made its final report to the Russian space agency, Roskosmos, concerning the attempted June 21 launch of our Cosmos 1 spacecraft.

Analyzing Signals in Real Time

Amir Alexander • July 07, 2005

Candidate signals sent in by users around the world will be quickly analyzed and compared to existing signals.

The Planetary Society Asks "Where is Cosmos 1?" Received Signals May Have Come from Solar Sail Spacecraft in Orbit

Susan Lendroth • July 01, 2005

The Planetary Society continues to investigate the mystery of what happened to its Cosmos 1 spacecraft - a joint project with Cosmos Studios - that launched last week on a Russian Volna rocket.

The Story of Cosmos 1 is Not Over: A Personal Report

Louis D. Friedman • June 25, 2005

The word failure is sticking in my craw. Certainly, we failed to achieve the objective of Cosmos 1: we did not achieve solar-sail flight. But I don’t think, with all we have done, that I can call Cosmos 1 a failure.

Piecing the Data Together

Louis D. Friedman • June 23, 2005

We’ve had a very exciting day here in Moscow. Bud Schurmeier and I met with Konstantin Pichkhadze, head of the Lavochkin Association, which built our spacecraft, Cosmos 1.

The Launch of Cosmos 1: Live Reports

Bruce Betts • June 21, 2005

In the past twenty-four hours, the Russian space agency (RKA) has made a tentative conclusion that the Volna rocket carrying Cosmos 1 failed during the firing of the first stage. This would mean that Cosmos 1 is lost.

Final Words Before Launch

Louis D. Friedman • June 21, 2005

Speaking by phone to a roomful of journalists in Pasadena less than 2 hours before the expected launch, project director Louis Friedman reiterated his confidence in the entire Cosmos 1 team.

Cosmos 1 Solar Sail will Carry CD into Orbit

Susan Lendroth • June 16, 2005

When Cosmos 1, the first solar sail spacecraft, launches on June 21, 2005, it will carry into Earth orbit a CD containing the names of over 75,000 members of The Planetary Society and the Japan Planetary Society, along with the works of early visionaries who inspired solar sailing.

Cosmos 1 "Mated" to Volna Rocket in Preparation for Tuesday Launch

Louis D. Friedman • June 15, 2005

The world’s first solar sail spacecraft, Cosmos 1, is now mated to its Volna launch vehicle and ready for its ride into space.

Worldwide Network to Track Cosmos 1

Susan Lendroth • June 02, 2005

From Moscow to the Marshall Islands and California to the Czech Republic, tracking stations around the world will receive data from Cosmos 1, the world's first solar sail spacecraft after it launches on June 21, 2005.

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