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Welcome to Carnival of Space #191

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2011/04/05 11:25 CDT

Welcome, everyone, to the Planetary Society Blog for the 191st Carnival of Space! Every week, a different webmaster or blogger hosts the Carnival, showcasing articles written on the topic of space.

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Checking in on Jupiter: the belt is coming back

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2011/03/25 03:46 CDT

Since it's been several months since I last took a look at Jupiter, I thought it was time to see what's up with the South Equatorial Belt.

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A dog-bone-shaped asteroid's two moons: Kleopatra, Cleoselene, and Alexhelios

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2011/02/23 12:47 CST

Asteroid (216) Kleopatra has been interesting to astronomers for a long time because its brightness is highly variable, but it seems to get more interesting every time somebody looks at it with a new instrument. This week a paper was published in Icarus revealed that it's 30 to 50% empty space.

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Close approach to Earth turns Apollo into Aten

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2011/02/08 12:49 CST

Last week we got buzzed by a very small asteroid, something that happens fairly often. But there were several details that made the close approach of asteroid 2011 CQ1 worthy of note.

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Jupiter's outbreak is spreading

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2010/11/22 11:03 CST

Jupiter, always a pretty sight in the sky, is now worth visiting every day; the "outbreak" that heralds the return of Jupiter's formerly red, now fadedsouth equatorial belt is expanding and multiplying.

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The Disturbance is Starting

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2010/11/11 10:48 CST

Jupiter's faded belt may be coming back.

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DPS 2010: Pluto and Charon opposition surges, Nix and Hydra masses, Pluto and Eris compositions

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2010/10/25 11:18 CDT

An awful lot of the talks in the Pluto session on Tuesday morning, October 5, at the Division of Planetary Sciences meeting spent more time focusing on how bad weather conditions were during the astronomers' attempts to view Pluto as it occulted background stars than they did on any measurements or science that came out from the data.

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The August 20, 2010 Jupiter fireball -- and the March 5, 1979 one

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2010/08/24 11:36 CDT

Following up on the story I first posted on August 22, the Jupiter impact fireball first noticed by Japanese amateur astronomer Masayuki Tachikawa has been independently confirmed by two other Japanese astronomers.

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Yet another Jupiter impact!? August 20, seen from Japan

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2010/08/22 05:03 CDT

Yet another Jupiter impact!? August 20, seen from Japan

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Jupiter has lost a belt!

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2010/05/10 05:22 CDT

Via Daniel Fischer's Tweet about a blog entry by Astro BobI learned of something which should be obvious to anyone who has trained even a rather small telescope on Jupiter over the past few weeks: one of its iconic stripes is just plain gone.

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Gravity's Bow

Posted by Timothy Reed on 2009/06/15 03:56 CDT

Timothy Reed explains how optical telescopes are tested for gravity sag, and the methods used to counteract or compensate for it.

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Aloha, Io

Posted by John Spencer on 2009/06/08 01:49 CDT

Taking a look at Jupiter's moon, Io, from Hawaii.

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Farewell to Hubble, Obama Calls, Astronauts Testify to Congress as Shuttle is Set to Land

Posted by Ken Kremer on 2009/05/22 05:13 CDT

Farewell to Hubble, Obama Calls, Astronauts Testify to Congress as Shuttle is Set to Land

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An Auspicious Week for Astronomy

Posted by Mark Adler on 2009/05/11 11:54 CDT | 1 comment

On Monday, if all goes well, we will launch the Space Shuttle to rejuvenate one the greatest scientific missions launched on or off the Earth: the Hubble Space Telescope.

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Mapping Mars, now and in history

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2009/02/26 04:23 CST

Planetary cartographer Phil Stooke has been working on a cool project to compose and compare maps of Mars that show how we saw the planet throughout the Space Age.

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Treasures from Mars' ancient history

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2009/01/28 12:06 CST

In which I discover Earl Slipher's Mars: The Photographic Story.

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No Longer Boring: 'Fireworks' and Other Surprises at Uranus Spotted Through Adaptive Optics

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2004/11/11 07:10 CST

Uranus has the unfortunate reputation of being the most boring planet in the solar system. But where it appeared to be a nearly featureless, hazy blue ball to Voyager 2, it is now blooming dozens of clouds that are visible to the sharp-eyed Keck II Telescope.

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Close Your Left Eye, Then Your Right: Simultaneous Observations of Asteroid 4179 Toutatis from Two Chilean Telescopes Demonstrate Parallax

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla on 2004/09/29 12:00 CDT

This morning, asteroid 4179 Toutatis was so close to Earth that simultaneous observations from two telescopes in the same country could show parallax that is obvious even to the least experienced observer. The two telescopes belong to The European Southern Observatory and are located at La Silla and Paranal in Chile

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