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Making an ugly rock beautiful

Emily Lakdawalla • November 02, 2012

Today I stumbled upon the Lunar and Planetary Institute's Lunar Sample Atlas, and was reminded of how much I love petrographic thin sections. They can make unassuming, cruddy looking rocks beautiful.

Pretty Picture: Eagle's Landing

Emily Lakdawalla • September 13, 2012

Amateur image processor Tom Dahl's spectacularly high-resolution version of Buzz Aldrin's panoramic view of the Apollo 11 landing site.

The Moon is a KREEPy place

Emily Lakdawalla • April 27, 2011

If you go to a conference about lunar geology, sooner or later you'll hear the term "KREEP" bandied about. (And almost as soon as KREEP is mentioned, a bad pun will be made. It's inevitable.) Context will tell you it has something to do with a special kind of lunar rock, but that'll only get you so far. What is KREEP, and why is it important on the Moon?

Comparing Clementine and Chandrayaan-1 spectra from the Moon

Emily Lakdawalla • April 11, 2011

In a paper recently published in the Journal of Geophysical Research, Georgiana Kramer and several coauthors performed a careful comparison of two data sets that seem like they're measuring the same things, so you'd think that the measurements they took would match between the two instruments. But they don't quite match.

New Flickr collection of historical NASA photos

Emily Lakdawalla • August 30, 2010

NASA announced today that they had placed several new sets of historical photos on their "NASA on the Commons" Flickr site, and invited the public to help tag and caption the photos.

Back to Apollo? Or Time for a Restart?

Charlene Anderson • July 02, 2010

To see the bigger picture, it can help to step back a bit from your current position. Sometimes you need to consider the past to inform your vision for the future.

Likely candidate for an un-collapsed lava tube

Emily Lakdawalla • June 21, 2010

In February, the Chandrayaan-1 science team had a meeting in Ahmedabad, India, to share their results with each other.

13 things that saved Apollo 13

Emily Lakdawalla • May 06, 2010

Universe Today has recently completed a fantastic, thought-provoking series on the near-disaster of the Apollo 13 mission, which unfolded forty years ago last month.

Gorgeous high-res image of the Apollo 17 landing site

Emily Lakdawalla • October 28, 2009

The LROC team posted today a new image of the Apollo 17 landing site, captured after Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter had gotten in to its 50-kilometer mapping orbit, so this is much more detailed than the previous view.

LROC nabs image of the Apollo 14 S-IVB impact site

Emily Lakdawalla • October 08, 2009

As a reminder that we've been crashing stuff into the Moon for decades, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) team released today a photo of the crater made by the spent upper stage of the Saturn rocket that lofted the Apollo 14 mission to the Moon.

The Power of Lighting Conditions

Samuel Lawrence • July 26, 2009

For over four decades, the lunar science community has absorbed the information from the Apollo missions. Although many important questions were answered, many important new questions are waiting to be tackled -- which is the very essence of science and exploration.

Science enables exploration, exploration enables science

Samuel Lawrence • July 22, 2009

One primary goal of the LRO mission is to acquire the amazing bounty of scientific data necessary to enable future human lunar exploration and utilization. But why should we even bother going back?

This is a special day...

Samuel Lawrence • July 20, 2009

It is a day where when all humans should take time to celebrate the momentous achievement that put two brave explorers on the face of another world. As Sir Arthur Clarke once famously said, the Apollo voyages will likely be the only events for which the 20th century will be remembered in the future, when humans live throughout the Solar System and beyond.

Climb Aboard Apollo 11 Time Machine

Susan Lendroth • July 16, 2009

Grab your bell bottoms and Tang, and travel back to 1969 when Apollo 11's journey to the Moon captivated the world, and Neil Armstrong's and Buzz Aldrin's boot prints in the lunar dust transformed us into a multi-world species.

Apollo Plus 40

Timothy Reed • June 18, 2009

The editors of the site, Nature, have begun their ApolloPlus40 blog.

Celebrate Apollo 11's 40th Anniversary with the Crew

Susan Lendroth • May 22, 2009

This summer, the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. will commemorate that extraordinary moment in history with a very special Apollo 11 celebration, featuring the mission's original crew members along with former Johnson Space Center Director Chris Kraft.

LPSC: Thursday: Rovers, Titan, Mars, Venus Express, Neptune

Ted Stryk • March 14, 2008

I spent a large portion of the day at the Lunar and Planetary Institute's library and presented my own poster during the poster sessions, so my coverage of Thursday's sessions is limited.

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