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Space Shuttle: Not Designed by Hollywood

Mat Kaplan • November 02, 2010

A brief musing on the public opinion of the shuttle when it was first unveiled, and now, as it's about to be retired.

Voyager Mission Status Bulletins: Jupiter and Saturn

Emily Lakdawalla • September 24, 2010

Last week I posted a stack of Voyager Mission Status Bulletins, which were once the main resource for space enthusiasts to follow the dramatic events and photos of an in-flight space mission.

Back to Apollo? Or Time for a Restart?

Charlene Anderson • July 02, 2010

To see the bigger picture, it can help to step back a bit from your current position. Sometimes you need to consider the past to inform your vision for the future.

Jupiter's faded belt: It's happened before, and it'll happen again

Emily Lakdawalla • June 16, 2010

When I wrote a post about Jupiter's missing South Equatorial Belt in May, I had three main questions: how long did it take for the belt to go away, has this happened before, and how can a planet as big as Jupiter change its appearance so quickly?

Venus, and the Moon, and Atlantis, and ISS, and Magellan

Pam Chadbourne • May 14, 2010

Pam Chadbourne, one of the many engineers who made the Magellan Radar Mapper mission possible, sent this note out to Magellan team members this morning, and graciously permitted me to post it here.

13 things that saved Apollo 13

Emily Lakdawalla • May 06, 2010

Universe Today has recently completed a fantastic, thought-provoking series on the near-disaster of the Apollo 13 mission, which unfolded forty years ago last month.

Spirit: Schrödinger's Rover

Emily Lakdawalla • April 28, 2010

Either Spirit is the longest-lived landed Mars mission ever, or she is not. We won't know for certain unless we manage to observe a radio signal from her.

Hubble turns 20

Emily Lakdawalla • April 23, 2010

Tomorrow is the 20th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope. It's hard to believe it's been going strong for so many years.

LROC spots Russian "monument" to International Women's Day

Emily Lakdawalla • March 19, 2010

There was a piece of the Lunar-Reconnaissance-Orbiter-spots-the-Lunokhods story that I was intrigued by but just didn't have the time this week to investigate properly.

Twenty years since Voyager's last view

Emily Lakdawalla and Charlene Anderson • February 12, 2010

On Sunday comes the twentieth anniversary of an iconic image from the Voyager mission: the "Pale Blue Dot" photo of Earth caught in a sunbeam, which was captured by Voyager 1 as part of a Solar System Family Portrait.

Four hundred and fourteen years since Galileo

Emily Lakdawalla • December 07, 2009

Galileo, the scientist, discovered the Galilean satellites of Jupiter four hundred years ago next month, while Galileo, the mission, arrived at Jupiter to study those moons in situ fourteen years ago Sunday.

Climb Aboard Apollo 11 Time Machine

Susan Lendroth • July 16, 2009

Grab your bell bottoms and Tang, and travel back to 1969 when Apollo 11's journey to the Moon captivated the world, and Neil Armstrong's and Buzz Aldrin's boot prints in the lunar dust transformed us into a multi-world species.

Deep Inside Europa

5thstar • June 23, 2009

In 1995, 572 astronaut applicants were narrowed down to 125 based on their resumes and English scores, then down to 48 based on paper exams and brief medical checks. These 48 candidates went through a week of comprehensive medical checks and job interviews.

Apollo Plus 40

Timothy Reed • June 18, 2009

The editors of the site, Nature, have begun their ApolloPlus40 blog.

Connections

David Seal • June 02, 2009

David Seal muses on his time as the mission planner for Cassini, and the history behind its name, and astronomy in Rome.

Celebrate Apollo 11's 40th Anniversary with the Crew

Susan Lendroth • May 22, 2009

This summer, the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. will commemorate that extraordinary moment in history with a very special Apollo 11 celebration, featuring the mission's original crew members along with former Johnson Space Center Director Chris Kraft.

An Auspicious Week for Astronomy

Mark Adler • May 11, 2009

On Monday, if all goes well, we will launch the Space Shuttle to rejuvenate one the greatest scientific missions launched on or off the Earth: the Hubble Space Telescope.

White Rock through the Ages: Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (2006-present)

Emily Lakdawalla • May 08, 2008

I apologize for the long hiatus in this White Rock series, but I hope this entry will be worth the wait.

White Rock through the ages: Mars Global Surveyor (1997-2006)

Emily Lakdawalla • February 22, 2008

We first spotted the strange bright feature colloquially known as "White Rock" in Mariner 9 images from 1972, and revisited it, without learning much more, in Viking images from the late 1970s.

White Rock through the ages: Viking (1976-1980)

Emily Lakdawalla • February 13, 2008

This is the second installment in my look at one enigmatic feature on Mars as seen by all its orbiters through the more than thirty years of spacecraft observations.

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