Join Donate

Blog Archive

 

Clouds and haze and dust, oh my!

Sarah Hörst • March 24, 2016

What types of aerosols do we find in the atmospheres around the Solar System, and why does what we call them—clouds vs. haze vs. dust—matter? Sarah Hörst explains.

Dinosaurs & Space— and Biology, Physics, Chemistry, and Planets: These are a Few of Our Favorite Things

Bill Nye • March 15, 2016

One of my favorite times of the year is upon us: the national conference of the National Science Teacher Association (NSTA). For the last couple of—er… decades, I’ve given lectures at this conference to support science teachers and find out what’s on their minds this school year.

"Planet Nine" update: Possible resonances beyond the Kuiper belt?

Emily Lakdawalla • March 08, 2016

A new paper by Renu Malhotra proposes that an undiscovered distant planet could have organized extremely distant Kuiper belt objects into orbital resonances.

xkcd: Possible Undiscovered Planets

Emily Lakdawalla • January 22, 2016

Randall Munroe is a genius at disguising seriously educational infographics as funny jokes.

Theoretical evidence for an undiscovered super-Earth at the edge of our solar system

Emily Lakdawalla • January 20, 2016

It's looking likelier that there is an undiscovered planet orbiting beyond the Kuiper belt. If it's there, it's roughly 10 times the mass of Earth (or about half the mass of Neptune), likely never gets closer to the Sun than about 100 AU, and takes more than 10,000 years to orbit the Sun.

Capturing the Rhythm of Space: Insights from 47th DPS Meeting

Deepak Dhingra • January 07, 2016

The Division of Planetary Science (DPS) Meeting saw many exciting scientific discussions spanning the range of processes on different planetary bodies, as well as their replication in the laboratory and in models.

It's your data: Curating NASA's science treasures

Emily Lakdawalla • January 05, 2016

One of the great things about NASA is that all the data returned from all of the missions all over the solar system belong to you, the public. NASA shares all these data, and more, through the Planetary Data System, the Minor Planet Center, the Astromaterials Office, and the Astrogeology Science Center.

Pluto updates from AGU and DPS: Pretty pictures from a confusing world

Emily Lakdawalla • December 21, 2015

Pluto is reluctant to give up its secrets. Last week at the American Geophysical Union meeting I attended sessions featuring results from the New Horizons mission, and most of the presentations could be summed up thusly: the data sets are terrific, but there are still a lot of Pluto features that have scientists scratching their heads.

Curiosity stories from AGU: The fortuitous find of a puzzling mineral on Mars, and a gap in Gale's history

Emily Lakdawalla • December 18, 2015

Yesterday at the American Geophysical Union meeting, the Curiosity science team announced the discovery of a mineral never before found on Mars. The finding was the result of a fortuitous series of events, but as long as Curiosity's instruments continue to function well, it's the kind of discovery that Curiosity should now be able to repeat.

Favorite Astro Plots #3: The rate of lunar cratering

Emily Lakdawalla • November 30, 2015

The third entry in my series of blog posts about Favorite Astro Plots contains one of the biggest discoveries from the Apollo program -- as well as one of the biggest questions in planetary science. The chart was nominated by planetary scientist Barbara Cohen. It has to do with the ages of surfaces on the Moon.

Detecting Dust Devils with Insight

Ralph Lorenz • November 11, 2015

Planetary scientist and dust devil expert Ralph Lorenz describes how the upcoming Mars InSight lander's sensitive seismometer might be able to detect dust devils.

DPS 2015: Pluto's small moons Styx, Nix, Kerberos, and Hydra [UPDATED]

Emily Lakdawalla • November 10, 2015

For my first post on results from the Division for Planetary Sciences meeting, I'm going to tell you about Pluto's small moons: Styx, Nix, Kerberos, and Hydra, their bright colors and wacky rotation states.

A Roundup of Dust Devil Research

Ralph Lorenz • November 02, 2015

Planetary scientist Ralph Lorenz briefs us on the current state of our knowledge on dust devils on Earth and Mars.

Favorite Astro Plots #2: Condensation of the solar system

Emily Lakdawalla • October 14, 2015

Behold: the story of how our solar system began, in one chart. This is the second installment in a series of planetary scientists' favorite plots. Today's #FaveAstroPlot was suggested by spectroscopist Michael Bramble.

Favorite Astro Plots #1: Asteroid orbital parameters

Emily Lakdawalla • October 01, 2015

This is the first in a series of posts in which scientists share favorite planetary science plots. For my #FaveAstroPlot, I explain what you can see when you look at how asteroid orbit eccentricity and inclination vary with distance from the Sun.

NASA's Mars Announcement: Present-day transient flows of briny water on steep slopes

Emily Lakdawalla • September 28, 2015

NASA held a press briefing today to publicize a cool incremental result in the story of present-day liquid water on Mars. How big a deal is this story? Was all the pre-announcement hype justified? Is this just NASA discovering water on Mars for the zillionth time? What does this mean for things many space fans care about: life on Mars or future human exploration?

Mega Hemorrhaging Total Lunar Eclipse Sept 27-28, 2015

Bruce Betts • September 24, 2015

There will be a spectacular total lunar eclipse on the night of Sept. 27-28, 2015, a newly dubbed Mega Hemorrhaging Eclipse. Here is info on what lunar eclipses are and how to observe the eclipse.

A Free, Online Course Exploring the Science of Phobos and Deimos

Casey Dreier • September 19, 2015

Impress your friends and wow your colleagues by learning all about Mars's moons.

How the duck got its neck: Rapid temperature changes from self-shadowing may explain 67P's unusual activity and shape

Emily Lakdawalla • September 11, 2015

When Rosetta approached comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko last summer, both its shape and its activity were surprising. It looked like two comets welded together at a skinny neck. A new paper explains how the neck may be steepening itself.

DSCOVR's Halo

Dave Doody • July 28, 2015

The Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) has begun sending us fresh, whole-hemisphere images of our own fragile planet. Some sources say that the spacecraft is "orbiting" the L1 point. Dave Doody thinks this warrants some scrutiny.

Items 21 - 40 of 366  Previous12345678910Next
astronaut on Phobos
Let's Change the World

Become a member of The Planetary Society and together we will create the future of space exploration.

Join Today

LightSail
LightSail

LightSail 2 will launch aboard the SpaceX Falcon Heavy. Be part of this epic point in space exploration history!

Donate

You are here: