Join Donate

Blog Archive

 

Another marvelous image from Cassini's Nov 2 Enceladus flyby

Emily Lakdawalla • November 03, 2009

This image goodie was produced from the raw images from Cassini's close encounter with Saturn's geyser moon Enceladus yesterday by Gordan Ugarkovic.

Cassini's Enceladus encounter, with bonus Tethys

Emily Lakdawalla • November 02, 2009

Raw images from Cassini's close pass by Enceladus today started appearing on the JPL raw images website, and some less-compressed versions of a few of them showed up on the CICLOPS website.

Rhea, Enceladus, Mimas, and Tethys, oh my!

Emily Lakdawalla • October 15, 2009

With the last Titan flyby on October 12, Cassini came back to an orbit that's nearly in the equatorial plane, and immediately rewarded us with some fine views of several of the icy moons. Here are a bunch of images of those moons.

Designing the Cassini Tour

John Smith • June 07, 2009

Each Titan flyby is not a fork in the road, but rather a Los Angeles style cloverleaf in terms of the dizzying number of possible destinations. So how did our current and future plans for the path of the Cassini spacecraft come to be? That's the question Dave Seal put to me since that's my job -- I am a tour designer.

Connections

David Seal • June 02, 2009

David Seal muses on his time as the mission planner for Cassini, and the history behind its name, and astronomy in Rome.

A Moon Among Stars

Emily Lakdawalla • December 31, 2008

A very pretty picture of a moon among stars. Happy 2009, everyone!

Showing off Saturn's moons

Emily Lakdawalla • February 19, 2008

There was a press release from the Cassini mission today about a pile of papers (14 of them!) being published in the journal Icarus about Saturn's icy moons. I haven't had time to read more than the overview article yet, but I wanted to come up with a graphic for an overview of Saturn's moons, and I couldn't resist delving into the massive database of Cassini images to produce something new

A billion dollars won't get you back to Enceladus or Titan

Emily Lakdawalla • May 17, 2007

The Outer Planets Assessment Group or OPAG met two weeks ago, and the presentations from the meeting were recently posted online.

Enceladus is a drag on Saturn's radio emissions

Emily Lakdawalla • March 22, 2007

What should arrive in my inbox today but a press release from the Cassini RPWS and magnetometer teams saying, in part, "the little moon Enceladus is weighing down giant Saturn's magnetic field so much that the field is rotating slower than the planet."

LPSC: Tuesday: Volcanism and tectonism on Saturn's satellites

Anne Verbiscer • March 14, 2007

I received this report on the Tuesday afternoon special session on volcanism and tectonism on Saturn's satellites from Anne Verbiscer, an astronomer from the University of Virginia who I first met at the Division of Planetary Sciences meeting in 2005.

CIRS gets another view of Enceladus' south polar hot spot

Emily Lakdawalla • December 22, 2006

There's a new image product released from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on Cassini, an instrument that is capable of measuring the temperatures on the extremely cold surfaces of Saturn's moons and rings.

New names for Enceladus' features

Emily Lakdawalla • November 15, 2006

The IAU has just approved new names for 35 craters, dorsa, fossae, and sulci on the surface of Enceladus, based upon Cassini's high-resolution mapping of the little moon. What are dorsa, fossae, and sulci, you might ask?

LPSC: Thursday: The Moons of Jupiter and the future of Outer Planet Exploration

Emily Lakdawalla • March 17, 2006

I said earlier I was going to cover the poster sessions next, and there are some cool things that I want to write about, but I thought I'd better get to something a bit more topical a bit sooner: Europa and the other Galilean satellites, and when (if!?) we'll be exploring them again.

LPSC: Wednesday afternoon: Cassini at Enceladus

Emily Lakdawalla • March 17, 2006

So after those two rover talks I skipped over to the other large room to listen to what the Cassini science teams had to say about Enceladus.

The hubbub about Enceladus

Emily Lakdawalla • March 09, 2006

I just posted a very brief story about all of the press releases that have been whizzing around today about the possibility of liquid water on Enceladus.

Many, many views of Saturn's moons

Emily Lakdawalla • February 10, 2006

Another thing I've been trying to catch up on is the daily imaging activities of Cassini, but that, too, has been tough because Cassini has been taking so dang many pictures!

Cassini Photographs the Fountains of Enceladus (and gets pics of Tethys, Janus, Epimetheus, and the G ring too)

Emily Lakdawalla • November 30, 2005

Emily tackles this morning's ESA press conference about Huygens.

Cassini tour page revised

Emily Lakdawalla • July 30, 2005

Cassini mission planner Dave Seal just gave me the latest reference trajectory for Cassini, so I've gone through and updated the flyby altitudes on the Cassini tour page.

Enceladus is alive!

Emily Lakdawalla • July 29, 2005

It's official: Enceladus has joined the rarefied community of Solar System objects that have been caught in the act of making new geology.

Items 61 - 79 of 79  Previous1234
astronaut on Phobos
Let's Change the World

Become a member of The Planetary Society and together we will create the future of space exploration.

Join Today

LightSail
LightSail

LightSail 2 will launch aboard the SpaceX Falcon Heavy. Be part of this epic point in space exploration history!

Donate

You are here: