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The Antarctic search for meteorites: snow ends the season

ANSMET team • January 26, 2009

The team wraps up their collection activites.

The Antarctic search for meteorites: tantalizingly close to the 500-meteorite mark

ANSMET team • January 18, 2009

The season total is at 489, tantalizingly close to the 500 meteorite barrier.

The Antarctic search for meteorites: bad days make for more blog fodder

ANSMET team • January 13, 2009

Writer's block strikes the expedition, as the group continues to collect meteorites.

The Antarctic search for meteorites: 237 meteorites await the long drive to Houston

ANSMET team • January 09, 2009

Fifty-five meteorites are collected by the team in a single day.

The Antarctic search for meteorites: not for the impatient

ANSMET team • January 04, 2009

The team makes progress while facing extreme weather conditions.

The Antarctic search for meteorites: put-in at last; week of productive searches

ANSMET team • December 29, 2008

A week of productive searching near the Davis Nunataks.

The Antarctic search for meteorites: more waiting; runway's ready; ralph goes home

ANSMET team • December 22, 2008

As the team waits, the runway is finished, and Ralph makes an exit.

The Antarctic search for meteorites: waiting

ANSMET team • December 17, 2008

The team is delayed for a week in McMurdo.

The Antarctic search for meteorites: preparations

ANSMET team • December 10, 2008

The team arrives in Antarctica to prepare for the expedition.

The Antarctic search for meteorites: in Christchurch, New Zealand

ANSMET team • December 02, 2008

The rest of ANSMET's team are in Christchurch after a long, long session of travel.

The Antarctic search for meteorites: introduction

ANSMET team • November 25, 2008

ANSMET will post blog entires on their research during their 33rd field season.

The Antarctic search for meteorites: who's going, and where we are going

ANSMET team • November 01, 2008

A summary of the 2008-2009 expedition team, and where they will go to hunt meteorites.

Sands on Earth, Sands on Mars

Jim Bell • June 13, 2008

One of the ways that planetary scientists try to understand the origin and evolution of landforms on other planets is by studying similar kinds of landforms or "analogs" here on the Earth. For the past few days I've been working with a group of colleagues doing just that--specifically, studying dunes in the Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve in order to try to better understand the nature of sand dunes on Mars.

Special Coverage from the 2006 Arctic Mars Analogue Svalbard Expedition

Jake Maule • August 22, 2006

Jake Maule reports from the 2006 Arctic Mars Analogue Svalbard Expedition.

Europa on Earth: The Sulfur Springs of Borup Fiord Pass, Ellesmere Island

Stephen Grasby • July 19, 2006

From June 21 to July 6, 2006, a four-person team traveled to Borup Fiord Pass to perform geological field studies to compare with satellite images.

The Borup Fiord Field Site

Emily Lakdawalla • July 01, 2006

The Sulfur Springs of Borup Fiord Pass, Ellesmere Island, offer an excellent Europa analog.

The Devon Diaries

Emily Lakdawalla • July 24, 2002

Emily Lakdawalla reports on her expedition to Devon Island, where The Planetary Society is taking steps toward the goal of humans and robots working together to explore Mars.

Haughton Impact Crater

Emily Lakdawalla • January 01, 2002

Haughton Crater measures about 20 kilometers (12.4 miles) in diameter, and was formed 23 million years ago when either an asteroid or a comet collided with our planet.

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