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Blog Archive

 

Your guide to future total solar eclipses

Bruce Betts • October 02, 2017

Bruce Betts provides a guide to all total solar eclipses through the end of the 2020s, with dates and locations.

Earth flyby tests OSIRIS-REx's cameras

Emily Lakdawalla • September 28, 2017

As expected, OSIRIS-REx's Earth flyby on September 22 was a success. The mission is slowly releasing beautiful images of our home worlds taken by its many cameras following the flyby.

OSIRIS-REx Earth flyby: What to Expect

Emily Lakdawalla • September 19, 2017

OSIRIS-REx launched on September 8, 2016. Now, a year later, it's returning to its home to get a second boost on to its destination, the asteroid Bennu. It'll test all its cameras on Earth and the Moon in the 10 days after the flyby.

Voyager 40th anniversary: Reflecting on the pale blue dot

Emily Lakdawalla • September 05, 2017

Today is the 40th anniversary of the launch of Voyager 1. Four decades later, both spacecraft survive, still producing science, still working on their interstellar missions. On the occasion of the anniversary, we revisit Carl Sagan's reflections on the significance of the Voyager missions.

Chasing the total solar eclipse at 38,000 feet

Tanya Harrison • August 24, 2017

Where did you venture to view the Great American Eclipse? About 100 people were lucky enough to make the trip of a lifetime for it: 38,000 feet above the Pacific Ocean, courtesy of Alaska Airlines.

NASA experiments will watch eclipse's effect on atmosphere

Heather Hunter • August 18, 2017

The upcoming solar eclipse isn’t just about watching the Moon block out the Sun. A suite of NASA-funded science experiments will to study the unseen effects of the eclipse on Earth's atmosphere.

A dispatch from the path of totality: the 2017 solar eclipse in Ravenna, Nebraska

Shane Pekny • August 15, 2017

Ravenna, population 1,400, sits on the plains of central Nebraska, and almost on the center line of the path of totality for the upcoming Great American Eclipse. Nebraska native Shane Pekny reports on how this small town is preparing for the big event.

Book Review: Sun Moon Earth

Merc Boyan • August 14, 2017

With the North American Total Solar Eclipse coming on August 21, people across the continent are getting eclipse mania! Astronomer Tyler Nordgren has written a detailed book on eclipses with a special focus on the August 21st event.

Sharing an eclipse with kids

Emily Lakdawalla • July 28, 2017

Here's a simple and safe way to observe a partial eclipse that's appropriate for young children, with no eclipse glasses or other special equipment needed.

Your Guide to the Great American Eclipse of 2017

Bruce Betts • July 17, 2017

The Moon will totally eclipse the Sun for the first time as seen from the continental United States in more than 40 years on August 21, 2017. What are eclipses, and what's special about this one?

Geology on Mars: Using stratigraphic columns to tell the story of Gale Crater

Heidi Stauffer • May 15, 2017

Stratigraphic columns are a basic tool in geology, used on both Earth and Mars to tell the story of a location. But what are they really?

Radar in Earth and Planetary Science, Part 2

Heather Hunter • May 12, 2017

Heather Hunter brings us the next installment in her series on radio detection and ranging.

Fossils or good-looking rocks? Why searching for life on other worlds is hard

Elias Nakouzi • April 13, 2017

If you find a structure that looks like ancient life, can you be really sure that it is ancient life?

Unraveling a Martian enigma: The hidden rivers of Arabia Terra

Joel Davis • March 21, 2017

Arabia Terra has always been a bit of a martian enigma. Planetary scientist Joel Davis takes us on a tour of its valley networks and their significance in telling the story of water on Mars.

Radar in Earth and Planetary Science: An Intro

Heather Hunter • February 24, 2017

Heather Hunter explains how radar works and what it's used for on Earth and beyond.

Microbes exist deep inside Earth’s craters. Could this be the secret to finding life on other worlds?

Bryan J. Rodriguez-Colon • February 06, 2017

Earth possesses amazing biological diversity. Every corner of this planet—no matter how bizarre the place—is inhabited by microorganisms. This includes impact craters.

GOES-R: What’s Next?

Heather Hunter • December 23, 2016

After a series of maneuvers in-orbit, GOES-R—now known as GOES-16—has reached its designated location in space. What happens next?

GOES-R: A GOES Primer

Heather Hunter • November 14, 2016

The current GOES-East and GOES-West have been faithfully providing continuous imagery and data on Earth and space weather for almost a decade. So, with the launch of the first of the next generation of GOES satellites, GOES-R, what is NOAA trying to accomplish?

A week in the solar system

Jason Davis • November 10, 2016

A roundup of pretty pictures and news from our robotic ambassadors around the solar system, from November 4 through 8.

New Gems from the Moon

Bill Dunford • October 10, 2016

More than seven years after the end of its mission, JAXA has released the entire data set from Kaguya's HDTV cameras.

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