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Mars' valley networks tell us of a dry, then wet, then dry Mars

Emily Lakdawalla • September 10, 2013

Was there rainfall on Mars? Recent work mapping valley networks suggests there probably was -- but only for about 200 million years. What does this mean for life, and the Curiosity mission?

Curiosity update: AutoNav toward Mount Sharp, sols 373-383

Ken Herkenhoff • September 05, 2013

From sols 373 to 383 (August 23 to September 3, 2013), Curiosity traveled about 250 meters toward Mount Sharp over five drives, trying out her new AutoNav capability.

Updates on Curiosity from Ken Herkenhoff: Embarking for Mount Sharp (sols 326-372)

Ken Herkenhoff • August 23, 2013

United States Geological Survey scientist Ken Herkenhoff posts regular updates on the Curiosity science team's plans for the rover on Mars.

A special Phobos eclipse

Emily Lakdawalla • August 20, 2013

Those sneaky scientists on Curiosity managed to catch a Phobos transit of the Sun with one set of cameras, and to watch its shadow darkening the surface with another. COOL!

Movie of Phobos and Deimos from Curiosity: super cool and scientifically useful

Emily Lakdawalla • August 16, 2013

Yesterday, the Curiosity mission released the video whose potential I got so excited about a couple of weeks ago: the view, from Curiosity, of Phobos transiting Deimos in the Martian sky. In this post, Mark Lemmon answers a bunch of my questions about why they photograph Phobos and Deimos from rovers.

Curiosity's first year on Mars: Where's the science?

Emily Lakdawalla • August 07, 2013

Yesterday was the first anniversary of Curiosity's landing on Mars, and there was much rejoicing. It's been fun to look back at that exciting day, and it's been an opportunity to reflect on what Curiosity has accomplished in her first year. What science do we have to show for it?

One Year on Mars: My Favorite Moments from Planetfest 2012

Casey Dreier • August 06, 2013

It seems like it was just yesterday that 2000 people gathered in the Pasadena Convention Center to celebrate Curiosity's landing on Mars. All of Planetfest 2012 is online for your enjoyment.

TODAY at 4pm PDT: Google+ Hangout, Celebrate Curiosity's First Year on Mars with Deputy Scientist Ashwin Vasavada

Casey Dreier • August 05, 2013

It was just one year ago that Curiosity had her dramatic landing on the surface of Mars. Emily Lakdawalla and I will interview the Deputy Project Scientist of the Curiosity mission, Ashwin Vasavada, about the successes of the past year and the what to look forward to in the next

Curiosity is copying Cassini's tricks!

Emily Lakdawalla • August 03, 2013

Take a look at this amazing photo, captured by Curiosity from the surface of Mars on sol 351 (August 1, 2013). It is unmistakably Phobos.

Keeping up with Curiosity, almost a year after landing

Emily Lakdawalla • August 01, 2013

It seems like my attention wandered for just a moment, and all of a sudden Curiosity is really on the road. She's racked up drive after drive, methodically eating up the terrain between here and her goal: the ancient rocks at the foot of Mount Sharp.

Happy 32! Happy New Mars Year!

Emily Lakdawalla • July 31, 2013

They're too far apart to have a party, but today Curiosity and Opportunity could have rung in the New Mars Year. Today Mars reached a solar longitude of zero degrees and the Sun crossed Mars' equator, heralding the arrival of spring in the northern hemisphere and autumn in the southern hemisphere.

Programmable Mars Watch for $50

Ara Kourchians • July 11, 2013

Time is kept differently on Mars. This is because Mars itself rotates a little slower than Earth. This proves to be a pain when it comes to timekeeping.

Woohoo! The LEGO Curiosity rover is going to be a kit!

Emily Lakdawalla • June 18, 2013

The awesome LEGO Curiosity rover designed by Stephen Pakbaz is going to go into production!

Pretty pictures: Curiosity working late

Emily Lakdawalla • June 07, 2013

Just some cool photos of Curiosity lighting up the Cumberland drill hole after sunset for a little nighttime science work.

Curiosity update, sol 295: "Hitting the road" to Mount Sharp

Emily Lakdawalla • June 05, 2013

There was a Curiosity telephone conference this morning to make an exciting announcement: they're (almost) done at Glenelg and are preparing for the drive south to Mount Sharp. Allow me an editorial comment: finally!

Opportunity and Curiosity updates: Rolling and drilling and a little wear on the wheels

Emily Lakdawalla • May 20, 2013

For most of April, while Mars scuttled behind the Sun as seen from Earth, both Mars rovers were pretty inactive. Now that conjunction has ended, both are doing what rovers should be doing: roving and exploring. As of sol 3312 Opportunity had moved more than 300 meters southward toward Solander Point, while on her sol 279 Curiosity drilled at a second site, Cumberland.

Curiosity on Mars - Design, Planning, and the First Mars Year of Operations

Emily Lakdawalla • April 26, 2013

Last month, I formally entered a new phase of my career: I signed my first book contract. I'll be writing a book about the Curiosity mission through its prime mission, for Springer-Praxis.

Tides of light and ice: Water and rock made from snowmelt on Mars

Emily Lakdawalla • April 17, 2013

A recently published paper proposes that much of the sedimentary rock on Mars formed during rare, brief periods of very slight wetness under melting snow.

One Day in the Solar System

Bill Dunford • April 08, 2013

Dispatches from five different worlds--all sent by robotic spacecraft on the same day.

More Evidence for a Habitable Mars from EGU 2013

Casey Dreier • April 08, 2013

NASA's Curiosity rover has acquired further evidence that Mars's atmosphere was once dense enough to support liquid water on the surface.

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