La Bajada’s fault?

La Bajada’s fault?
La Bajada’s fault? As Opportunity drove downhill in Perseverance from station 1 to station 2 in September 2017, she drove right through this area, named La Bajada after the stop on El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, the old, 2,560-kilometer (about 1,591-mile) trade route between Mexico City and San Juan Pueblo, NM, the team’s naming theme since entering the valley. What drew the scientists were telltale signs of erosion on the bright outcrop (right). The rover drove backed uphill to investigate. Further research by Larry Crumpler indicates La Bajada is likely a fracture or fault. NASA / JPL-Caltech / Cornell / ASU

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