Cerealia Facula

Cerealia Facula
Cerealia Facula This view of Cerealia Facula was constructed with pictures Dawn took when it swooped as low as 21 miles (34 kilometers). This deposit of reflective salt in Occator Crater is the brightest region on Ceres. (We have seen Cerealia Facula and Occator many times before, most recently in the previous Dawn Journal.) The probe flew so close to the ground that each picture covered only a small area, so multiple orbital passes were required to collect all the high-resolution pictures that were combined to make this image. The isolated bright structure on the left is shown in more detail here, and we refer to it below to provide context for the size of other solar system bodies. Some gaps in the coverage at the time this view was assembled are filled with pictures Dawn took in 2016 from 240 miles (385 kilometers) high, the lowest altitude prior to June. The next picture below shows Cerealia Facula from another perspective. Full image and caption. NASA / JPL-Caltech / UCLA / MPS / DLR / IDA / PSI

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