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For the Media

Press Releases

Nine-Year-Old Names Asteroid Target of NASA Mission in Competition Run By The Planetary Society (May 1, 2013)

Asteroid (101955) 1999 RQ36 now has the much friendlier name "Bennu," thanks to a 3rd-grade student from North Carolina.

Student Asteroid Naming Contest Announced (September 4, 2012)

Students around the world have the opportunity to suggest names for an asteroid that will be visited by NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft later this decade.

Planetary Society Has Role with OSIRIS-REx Mission (May 25, 2011)

NASA has selected the OSIRIS-REx mission as the next New Frontiers mission, and the Planetary Society is excited to announce that it will be involved with many public outreach activities connected with the mission.

Videos

Images

OSIRIS-REx primary structure

OSIRIS-REx primary structure

The OSIRIS-REx spacecraft structure marks the beginning of building the system that will fly to Bennu.

Filed under pretty pictures, OSIRIS-REx, spacecraft

321 Science Presents: Asteroid Fact vs. Fiction

321 Science Presents: Asteroid Fact vs. Fiction

What is an asteroid and how much is science fact and how much science fiction? OSIRIS-REx presents the first 321Science video about asteroids. This video looks at asteroids in popular culture to explore how much is fact and how much is fiction.

Filed under near-Earth asteroids, fun, Earth impact hazard, asteroids, OSIRIS-REx, asteroid 101955

Michael Puzio, age 9

Michael Puzio, age 9

Michael Puzio is the winner of the contest to name the asteroid Bennu.

Filed under OSIRIS-REx

Michael Puzio, age 9

Michael Puzio, age 9

Michael Puzio is the winner of the contest to name asteroid Bennu.

Filed under OSIRIS-REx


The naming contest for the near Earth asteroid currently named (101955) 1999 RQ36 is a partnership of the Planetary Society; MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory, the discoverers of (101955) 1999 RQ36; and the University of Arizona, who under principal investigator Dante Lauretta was chosen by NASA to lead the OSIRIS-REx (Origins-Spectral Interpretation-Resource Identification-Security-Regolith Explorer) asteroid sample return mission.

Fly to an Asteroid!

Travel to Bennu on the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft!

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