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NASA’s New Planetary Mission Woes

Van Kane • December 27, 2013 • 2

NASA’s planetary science program depends on regular missions to solar system bodies to gather data. A combination of budget cuts and previous commitments to develop missions currently in the pipeline means that development of follow on missions may slow to a crawl. Van Kane looks at the current situation and NASA’s plans and then look at options the agency may consider if budgets remain tight into the next decade.

Destination: Europa!

Steve Vance • December 16, 2013 • 5

It's time to reassess Europa exploration, past, present and future. The Destination Europa! session at AGU, inspired by the eponymous website and movement, didn't take exactly that message as its theme, but it's what I got from the presentations. What an ELECTRIFYING meeting this has been for Europa exploration!

Europa: No Longer a "Should," But a "Must"

Casey Dreier • December 12, 2013 • 10

We've waited long enough, Europa cries out for exploration and discovery. It's time to heed that cry.

The Plumes of Europa

Leigh Fletcher • December 12, 2013 • 12

2013 has been a rather exciting year for Europa scientists. Today's exciting news: the Hubble Space Telescope discovery of water vapor plumes from the south pole of this icy moon.

Planetary Radio: Rise of the Europa Underground?

Mat Kaplan • November 26, 2013 • 2

This week's PlanRad talks to one of the creators of a new effort to build support for the Europa Clipper, a spacecraft that would tell us far more about what's going on under that icy moon's surface.

NASA's Europa Mission Concept Rejects ASRGs -- May Use Solar Panels at Jupiter Instead

Casey Dreier • September 05, 2013 • 6

The Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) is no longer an option for powering a potential Europa mission. The ASRG uses Plutonium-238 to generate electricity, but is far more efficient than past RTGs.

Jupiter and Io from Pioneer 10

Ted Stryk • August 02, 2013 • 2

This is a parting shot of Jupiter and Io, taken December 5, 1973, by the Pioneer 10 spacecraft, the first to see either world as a crescent.

Movie SciFi With Real Science? What a Concept!

Mat Kaplan • July 30, 2013 • 1

This week's Planetary Radio features the new indy film that relies on the best available science to create a thrilling and inspiring human mission to Jupiter's moon.

Scale comparisons of the solar system's major moons

Emily Lakdawalla • July 10, 2013 • 15

A few presentation slides with pretty pictures, sized to scale, of the large moons of the solar system.

A serendipitous observation of tiny rocks in Jupiter's orbit by Galileo

Emily Lakdawalla • May 17, 2013 • 3

A look at an older paper describing Galileo's possible sighting of individual ring particles orbiting Jupiter as companions to its inner moon Amalthea.

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