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Recap: Breakthrough Discuss 2018

Jason Davis • April 18, 2018

If you had a spaceship and could take it anywhere in the solar system to search for life, where would you go?

#LPSC2018: Understanding early Mars through fluvial features

Adeene Denton • April 02, 2018

One of the ways we understand Mars' early climatic and geologic history is through preserved fluvial features.

#LPSC2018: Groovy Galilean satellites

Harriet Brettle • March 30, 2018

The Jovian system is a busy place. The Groovy Galilean Satellites session at last week's Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC) covered analysis of past mission data, testable hypotheses for future missions, and discussion of the use of ground-based data.

#LPSC2018: Fungi in the lab, hot springs frozen cold, and exploding lakes

Emily Lakdawalla • March 29, 2018

The first astrobiology session at last week's Lunar and Planetary Science Conference featured talks on a huge variety of interesting topics, and was one of my favorite sessions at the meeting.

#LPSC2018: Collaborative notes from conference sessions

Emily Lakdawalla • March 28, 2018

At last week's Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, I tried a new experiment: collaborating with other attendees to take a shared set of notes.

#LPSC2018: An Apollo 17 session with moonwalker Jack Schmitt

Megan Kelley • March 27, 2018

The only geoscientist to walk on the Moon attended a conference session presenting results from the rocks he collected.

#LPSC2018: Mars mass wasting in the laboratory

Jake Robins • March 26, 2018

Mars today is a dynamic place. One visually dramatic sign of change on Mars is "mass wasting," more commonly known as "stuff falling downhill". Scientists presented the results of recent laboratory work on Mars mass wasting at last week's Lunar and Planetary Science Conference.

#LPSC2018: Titan Is Terrific!

Emily Lakdawalla • March 21, 2018

Emily's first report from the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference is on the solar system's most atmospheriffic satellite, Saturn's moon Titan.

#LPSC2018: A full week of planetary science

Emily Lakdawalla • March 15, 2018

It's time for the 49th annual Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC), a geology-focused meeting of planetary scientists. Here's a preview, and a call for help from attendees. I'll be presenting at two lunchtime workshops.

Sketching a science meeting

Emily Lakdawalla • March 02, 2018

The Planetary Society has always enjoyed the connections between science and art, so when I saw Leila Qışın's sketches pop up on her Twitter feed during the recent New Horizons team meeting, I knew I had to share them with you.

Speak your science: How to give a better conference talk

Emily Lakdawalla • February 06, 2018

Bad presentation often gets in the way of good science. Emily Lakdawalla offers her advice on how to present your scientific work effectively.

International meetings: Moon initiatives

James D. Burke • January 25, 2018

Interest is rising globally in expanded lunar science, resource exploration and eventually permanent human settlement. Also, the potential for commercial lunar enterprises is being seriously examined.

#AGU17: Spherical harmonics, gravity, and the depth of winds at Jupiter

Emily Lakdawalla • December 20, 2017

Results from the Juno gravity science experiment presented at last week's American Geophysical Union meeting suggest Jupiter's winds penetrate only to 3000 kilometers deep.

#AGU17: JunoCam science

Emily Lakdawalla • December 18, 2017

JunoCam may be an outreach instrument, but its superb photos of storms on Jupiter are providing plenty of data for scientists to talk about.

Brief note from #AGU17: Juno observes volcanism on Io

Emily Lakdawalla • December 13, 2017

At the American Geophysical Union meeting, members of the Juno team showed observations of active volcanism on Jupiter's moon Io.

Sharing Space in Australia

Erin Greeson • November 06, 2017

The Planetary Society’s 2017 journey to Australia expanded our perspective, advocacy and global community. It was rich with reminders close to Carl Sagan’s heart: We are all connected through time, humankind, and our origins in the stars.

#DPS17: The Moon's Giordano Bruno crater through many eyes

Emily Lakdawalla • October 30, 2017

Today's story from the Division for Planetary Sciences meeting looks at one youthful rayed crater on the Moon from many different spacecraft.

Then vs. Now: How the Debate Over a Distant Planet in the Solar System Has Evolved

Stephanie Hamilton • October 30, 2017

What have we learned about the distant objects in our Solar System beyond Neptune in the past year?

#DPS17: Wobbling the Moon and art by James Tuttle Keane

Emily Lakdawalla • October 24, 2017

James Tuttle Keane is increasingly famous (among planetary scientists anyway) for his remarkable illustrated notes from conferences. Here's his work from the Division for Planetary Sciences meeting, illustrating both his own and others' research.

#DPS2017: Progress report on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter images of comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring

Emily Lakdawalla • October 20, 2017

Three years ago, on October 19, 2014, comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring passed within 138,000 kilometers of Mars. At the 2017 meeting of the Division for Planetary Sciences of the American Astronomical Society, we heard a progress report on Mars orbiter imaging of the comet's nucleus.

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