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CIRS gets another view of Enceladus' south polar hot spot

Emily Lakdawalla • December 22, 2006

There's a new image product released from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on Cassini, an instrument that is capable of measuring the temperatures on the extremely cold surfaces of Saturn's moons and rings.

New names for Enceladus' features

Emily Lakdawalla • November 15, 2006

The IAU has just approved new names for 35 craters, dorsa, fossae, and sulci on the surface of Enceladus, based upon Cassini's high-resolution mapping of the little moon. What are dorsa, fossae, and sulci, you might ask?

LPSC: Thursday: The Moons of Jupiter and the future of Outer Planet Exploration

Emily Lakdawalla • March 17, 2006

I said earlier I was going to cover the poster sessions next, and there are some cool things that I want to write about, but I thought I'd better get to something a bit more topical a bit sooner: Europa and the other Galilean satellites, and when (if!?) we'll be exploring them again.

LPSC: Wednesday afternoon: Cassini at Enceladus

Emily Lakdawalla • March 17, 2006

So after those two rover talks I skipped over to the other large room to listen to what the Cassini science teams had to say about Enceladus.

The hubbub about Enceladus

Emily Lakdawalla • March 09, 2006

I just posted a very brief story about all of the press releases that have been whizzing around today about the possibility of liquid water on Enceladus.

Many, many views of Saturn's moons

Emily Lakdawalla • February 10, 2006

Another thing I've been trying to catch up on is the daily imaging activities of Cassini, but that, too, has been tough because Cassini has been taking so dang many pictures!

Bill Nye and people
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