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Headshot of Emily Lakdawalla

Emily Lakdawalla

Senior Editor and Planetary Evangelist

blog@planetary.org
+1-626-793-5100

Extended bio
Appearance calendar
and head shots

Emily Lakdawalla is a passionate advocate for the exploration of all of the worlds of our solar system. Through blogs, photos, videos, podcasts, print articles, Twitter, and any other medium she can put her hand to, Emily shares the adventure of space exploration with the world.

Emily holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in geology from Amherst College and a Master of Science degree in planetary geology from Brown University. She came to The Planetary Society in 2001 to oversee a portion of the Society's Red Rover Goes to Mars project, an education and public outreach program on the Mars Exploration Rover mission funded by LEGO. She has been writing and editing the Planetary Society Blog since 2005, reporting on space news, explaining planetary science, and sharing beautiful space photos. She appears weekly on the Society's Planetary Radio podcast, answering listener questions or rounding up the latest space news from the blog.

Emily has been an Administrator of the forum UnmannedSpaceflight.com since 2005, supporting a worldwide community of amateur space image processors. She is also a contributing editor to Sky & Telescope magazine.

She is now writing her first book, tentatively titled Curiosity on Mars: Design, Planning, and the First Mars Year of Operations, due out from Springer-Praxis in 2015. The book will explain the development, design, mission, and science of Curiosity with the same level of technical detail that she delivers in the Planetary Society Blog.

Emily can be reached at blog@planetary.org or @elakdawalla on Twitter.

Latest Blog Posts

HiRISE image coverage of the Curiosity field site on Mars, Version 3.0

Posted 2016/02/05 12:53 CST | 1 comment

There have been tons and tons of HiRISE images of the Curiosity landing region, and it has taken quite a lot of work for me to find, locate, and catalogue them. This post is a summary of what I've found; after five revisions and updates, it's now version 3.0 of the list.

30th anniversary images of Uranian moons

Posted 2016/02/02 01:06 CST | 6 comments

January 24 was the 30th anniversary of the Voyager flyby of Uranus. Uranian moons have been on my mind ever since New Horizons sent us close-up images of Charon. On the occasion of the anniversary, Ted Stryk produced latest-and-greatest versions of the Voyager views of these worlds.

What's up in solar system exploration: February 2016 edition

Posted 2016/01/29 11:57 CST | 2 comments

What's going on with our robotic planetary missions? In February I count more than 20 planetary spacecraft exploring six targets beyond Earth or cruising to new destinations.

Fun with a new data set: Chang'e 3 lander and Yutu rover camera data

Posted 2016/01/28 07:08 CST | 24 comments

Here, for the first time in a format easily accessible to the public, are hundreds and hundreds of science-quality images from the Chang'e 3 lander and Yutu rover.

Wide views of Mars from Mars Express

Posted 2016/01/27 10:59 CST | 4 comments

Geologist and amateur space image processor Justin Cowart has dug into the Mars Express archives and located some lovely, wide views across great swaths of the Martian globe.

xkcd: Possible Undiscovered Planets

Posted 2016/01/22 01:00 CST | 3 comments

Randall Munroe is a genius at disguising seriously educational infographics as funny jokes.

Theoretical evidence for an undiscovered super-Earth at the edge of our solar system

Posted 2016/01/20 11:54 CST | 37 comments

It's looking likelier that there is an undiscovered planet orbiting beyond the Kuiper belt. If it's there, it's roughly 10 times the mass of Earth (or about half the mass of Neptune), likely never gets closer to the Sun than about 100 AU, and takes more than 10,000 years to orbit the Sun.

Pretty pictures: Bittersweet goodies from Cassini at Titan, Enceladus, and Telesto

Posted 2016/01/15 02:00 CST | 7 comments

Tomorrow, Cassini will fly by Titan, picking up a gravity assist that will tilt its orbit slightly up and out of the ring plane. That will end what has been a wonderful year of frequent encounters with Saturnian moons.

Older blog posts »

Latest Processed Space Images

HiRISE view of Curiosity, sol 949 (April 8, 2015)

HiRISE view of Curiosity, sol 949 (April 8, 2015)

Posted 2016/02/02 | 0 comments

At the time that this photo was taken, Curiosity was driving onward from drill sites at Pahrump Hills and Telegraph Peak.

HiRISE view of Curiosity, sol 1094 (September 4, 2015)

HiRISE view of Curiosity, sol 1094 (September 4, 2015)

Posted 2016/02/02 | 0 comments

When Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter took this photo, Curiosity was traveling south across the rhythmic ridges of the Stimson unit, approaching Bagnold Dunes. HiRISE stared almost directly downward through relatively clear skies to take this photo, so it's especially crisp.

Detailed HiRISE view of Curiosity, sol 1094 (September 4, 2015)

Detailed HiRISE view of Curiosity, sol 1094 (September 4, 2015)

Posted 2016/02/02 | 0 comments

In this unusually sharp HiRISE image of Curiosity, you can even make out Curiosity's right-side wheels as distinct objects. Visit this page for a wider context view.

More pictures processed by Emily Lakdawalla »

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