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Headshot of Emily Lakdawalla

Emily Lakdawalla

Senior Editor and Planetary Evangelist

blog@planetary.org
+1-626-793-5100

Extended bio
Appearance calendar
and head shots

Emily Lakdawalla is a passionate advocate for the exploration of all of the worlds of our solar system. Through blogs, photos, videos, podcasts, print articles, Twitter, and any other medium she can put her hand to, Emily shares the adventure of space exploration with the world.

Emily holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in geology from Amherst College and a Master of Science degree in planetary geology from Brown University. She came to The Planetary Society in 2001 to oversee a portion of the Society's Red Rover Goes to Mars project, an education and public outreach program on the Mars Exploration Rover mission funded by LEGO. She has been writing and editing the Planetary Society Blog since 2005, reporting on space news, explaining planetary science, and sharing beautiful space photos. She appears weekly on the Society's Planetary Radio podcast, answering listener questions or rounding up the latest space news from the blog.

Emily has been an Administrator of the forum UnmannedSpaceflight.com since 2005, supporting a worldwide community of amateur space image processors. She is also a contributing editor to Sky & Telescope magazine.

She is now writing her first book, tentatively titled Curiosity on Mars: Design, Planning, and the First Mars Year of Operations, due out from Springer-Praxis in 2015. The book will explain the development, design, mission, and science of Curiosity with the same level of technical detail that she delivers in the Planetary Society Blog.

Emily can be reached at blog@planetary.org or @elakdawalla on Twitter.

Latest Blog Posts

Tons of fun with the latest Ceres image releases from Dawn

Posted 2015/05/22 04:59 CDT | 8 comments

Fantastic new images of Ceres continue to spill out of the Dawn mission, and armchair scientists all over the world are zooming into them, exploring them, and trying to solve the puzzles that they contain.

Rover eyes on rock layers on Mars

Posted 2015/05/19 04:27 CDT | 2 comments

Digging in to mission image archives yields similar images of layered Martian rocks from very different places.

Unseen latitudes of comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko -- revealed!

Posted 2015/05/15 12:11 CDT | 2 comments

A recent Rosetta image has revealed a good part of the comet's previously hidden southern terrain to the public for the first time.

New Horizons spots Kerberos and Styx

Posted 2015/05/12 05:56 CDT | 3 comments

New Horizons has now spotted every one of Pluto's satellites...all the ones we know about, that is.

Due to ion engine failure, PROCYON will not fly by an asteroid

Posted 2015/05/08 04:23 CDT | 2 comments

PROCYON, the mini-satellite launched with Hayabusa 2, will not be able to achieve its planned asteroid flyby due to the failure of its ion engine.

Curiosity update, sols 949-976: Scenic road trip and a diversion to Logan's Run

Posted 2015/05/06 06:04 CDT | 4 comments

Curiosity is finally on the road again! And she's never taken a more scenic route than this. Her path to Mount Sharp is taking her to the west and south, across sandy swales between rocky rises.

A week's worth of "RC3" images from Dawn at Ceres

Posted 2015/05/05 12:25 CDT | 1 comment

Now that Dawn is in its science orbit at Ceres, the mission has been releasing new images every weekday!

Farewell, MESSENGER

Posted 2015/05/01 06:55 CDT | 5 comments

There is one less robot exploring the solar system today. MESSENGER, which has orbited Mercury for four years, finally ran out of fuel and crashed into the planet at 17:26 UT on Thursday, April 30, 2015.

Older blog posts »

Latest Processed Space Images

51 views of Ceres, Dawn Rotation Characterization 3, May 4, 2015

51 views of Ceres, Dawn Rotation Characterization 3, May 4, 2015

Posted 2015/05/22 | 0 comments

Dawn took these images of Ceres over slightly more than one complete Ceres day on May 4, 2015. Dust specks have been cleaned from the images by painting over affected pixels. The original animation is available here.

Ceres' full rotation, Dawn Rotation Characterization 3, May 4, 2015

Ceres' full rotation, Dawn Rotation Characterization 3, May 4, 2015

Posted 2015/05/22 | 0 comments

This animation consists of 44 photos of Ceres taken over one complete Ceres day on May 4, 2015. Dawn was in a polar orbit, moving from north to south, so the ends of the animation don't quite match up. Dust specks have been cleaned from the images by painting over affected pixels. The original animation (which had 51 distinct frames, covering slightly more than one rotation) is available here.

Panorama across the lit side of Saturn's rings, May 10, 2014

Panorama across the lit side of Saturn's rings, May 10, 2014

Posted 2015/04/24 | 0 comments

Cassini scanned across the full width of Saturn's ring system, from the C ring at top, through the B ring at center, to the A ring at bottom. It took seven narrow-angle camera footprints to cover the breadth of the rings. The images are enlarged 150% from their original resolution.

More pictures processed by Emily Lakdawalla »

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