Help Shape the Future of Space Exploration

Join The Planetary Society Now  arrow.png

Join our eNewsletter for updates & action alerts

    Please leave this field empty
Headshot of Emily Lakdawalla

Emily Lakdawalla

Senior Editor and Planetary Evangelist

blog@planetary.org
+1-626-793-5100

Extended bio
Appearance calendar
and head shots

Emily Lakdawalla is a passionate advocate for the exploration of all of the worlds of our solar system. Through blogs, photos, videos, podcasts, print articles, Twitter, and any other medium she can put her hand to, Emily shares the adventure of space exploration with the world.

Emily holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in geology from Amherst College and a Master of Science degree in planetary geology from Brown University. She came to The Planetary Society in 2001 to oversee a portion of the Society's Red Rover Goes to Mars project, an education and public outreach program on the Mars Exploration Rover mission funded by LEGO. She has been writing and editing the Planetary Society Blog since 2005, reporting on space news, explaining planetary science, and sharing beautiful space photos. She appears weekly on the Society's Planetary Radio podcast, answering listener questions or rounding up the latest space news from the blog.

Emily has been an Administrator of the forum UnmannedSpaceflight.com since 2005, supporting a worldwide community of amateur space image processors. She is also a contributing editor to Sky & Telescope magazine.

She is now writing her first book, tentatively titled Curiosity on Mars: Design, Planning, and the First Mars Year of Operations, due out from Springer-Praxis in 2015. The book will explain the development, design, mission, and science of Curiosity with the same level of technical detail that she delivers in the Planetary Society Blog.

Emily can be reached at blog@planetary.org or @elakdawalla on Twitter.

Latest Blog Posts

New Horizons enters safe mode 10 days before Pluto flyby

Posted 2015/07/04 11:10 CDT | 0 comment

New Horizons decided to put on a little 4th of July drama for the mission's fans. It's currently in safe mode, and it will likely be a day or two before it recovers and returns to science, but it remains on course for the July 14 flyby. Here's the mission update in its entirety.

Pluto's progression: Third-to-last Pluto day before encounter

Posted 2015/07/03 08:49 CDT | 5 comments

Only two days remain until New Horizons' historic encounter with Pluto....two Pluto days, that is. Pluto and Charon rotate together once every 6.4 days, so as New Horizons has approached the pair over the last week, we've been treated to one stately progression of all of their longitudes.

What to expect when you're expecting a flyby: Planning your July around New Horizons' Pluto Pictures (version 2)

Posted 2015/06/24 07:57 CDT | 17 comments

Three months ago, I posted an article explaining what to expect during the flyby. This is a revised version of the same post, with some errors corrected, the expected sizes of Nix and Hydra updated, and times of press briefings added.

New Horizons update: Resolving features on Charon and seeing in color

Posted 2015/06/23 11:02 CDT | 14 comments

Only about three weeks remain until the flyby -- it's getting really close! I almost don't want the anticipation to end. New Horizons is now getting color images and is seeing features on Charon. Deep searches have yielded no new moons.

Transient hot spots on Venus: Best evidence yet for active volcanism

Posted 2015/06/18 06:42 CDT | 3 comments

In a paper released in Geophysical Research Letters today, Eugene Shalygin and coauthors have announced the best evidence yet for current, active volcanism on Venus. The evidence comes from the Venus Monitoring Camera, which saw transient hot spots in four locations along a system of rifts near Venus' equator. They saw the hot spots in two distinct episodes in 2008 and 2009.

Philae is awake! What's next for the comet lander's scientific mission?

Posted 2015/06/17 05:16 CDT | 5 comments

I woke up early Sunday morning to the dramatic news: Philae is back! With a few days to consider the telemetry, the Philae team is now talking about the science they hope to do. With comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko approaching perihelion in August, it's going to be an exciting ride.

Pluto and Charon spin among the stars

Posted 2015/06/16 08:10 CDT | 7 comments

I've spent a happy couple of days playing with raw data downloaded from the New Horizons website, making animations of the dances of Pluto and Charon.

Welcome home, AstroSamantha

Posted 2015/06/15 09:41 CDT | 2 comments

Three astronauts have returned to Earth, and while I'm happy that they landed safely, I'm very sad that astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti is not in space anymore to wish us "buona notte dallo spazio" with her lovely photos and piquant comments.

Older blog posts »

Latest Processed Space Images

Pluto and Charon spin among the stars (as of June 15, 2015)

Pluto and Charon spin among the stars (as of June 15, 2015)

Posted 2015/06/16 | 0 comments

Faint stars in the background of raw images from New Horizons allow the images to be aligned, giving us a sense of New Horizons' changing view on Pluto and Charon as it approaches the dancing pair. Images were taken between June 1 and 15, 2015. More information in this blog entry.

Pluto and Charon rotation sequence

Pluto and Charon rotation sequence

Posted 2015/06/16 | 0 comments

This animation contains 15 images captured between June 1 and 15. The images have been resized to account for the changing distance between New Horizons and the Pluto system during that time, which ranged from 50 to 35 million kilometers.

Curiosity's Topographic Traverse, sols 924-1000 and beyond

Curiosity's Topographic Traverse, sols 924-1000 and beyond

Posted 2015/06/10 | 0 comments

A route map for Curiosity drawn on a base contour map derived from a HiRISE digital terrain model by Peter Grindrod. Route map cartography by Phil Stooke.

More pictures processed by Emily Lakdawalla »

Facebook Twitter Email RSS AddThis

LightSail

Support LightSail!

Our LightSail test mission was successfully completed and our Kickstarter campaign ended June 26th, raising $1.24 million dollars for LightSail's 2016 solar sailing mission! Miss the Kickstarter campaign, but still want to donate? You can!

I want to help!

Featured Video

3D Printed Planetary Logo

Watch Now

Selfies to Space!

Take flight with a selfie on LightSail™ in 2016!

Send a Selfie Now

Join the New Millennium Committee

Let’s invent the future together!

Become a Member

Connect With Us

Facebook! Twitter! Google+ and more…
Continue the conversation with our online community!