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Headshot of Emily Lakdawalla

Emily Lakdawalla

Senior Editor and Planetary Evangelist

blog@planetary.org
+1-626-793-5100

Extended bio
Appearance calendar
and head shots

Emily Lakdawalla is a passionate advocate for the exploration of all of the worlds of our solar system. Through blogs, photos, videos, podcasts, print articles, Twitter, and any other medium she can put her hand to, Emily shares the adventure of space exploration with the world.

Emily holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in geology from Amherst College and a Master of Science degree in planetary geology from Brown University. She came to The Planetary Society in 2001 to oversee a portion of the Society's Red Rover Goes to Mars project, an education and public outreach program on the Mars Exploration Rover mission funded by LEGO. She has been writing and editing the Planetary Society Blog since 2005, reporting on space news, explaining planetary science, and sharing beautiful space photos. She appears weekly on the Society's Planetary Radio podcast, answering listener questions or rounding up the latest space news from the blog.

Emily has been an Administrator of the forum UnmannedSpaceflight.com since 2005, supporting a worldwide community of amateur space image processors. She is also a contributing editor to Sky & Telescope magazine.

She is now writing her first book, tentatively titled Curiosity on Mars: Design, Planning, and the First Mars Year of Operations, due out from Springer-Praxis in 2015. The book will explain the development, design, mission, and science of Curiosity with the same level of technical detail that she delivers in the Planetary Society Blog.

Emily can be reached at blog@planetary.org or @elakdawalla on Twitter.

Latest Blog Posts

A week's worth of "RC3" images from Dawn at Ceres

Posted 2015/05/05 12:25 CDT | 0 comment

Now that Dawn is in its science orbit at Ceres, the mission has been releasing new images every weekday!

Farewell, MESSENGER

Posted 2015/05/01 06:55 CDT | 3 comments

There is one less robot exploring the solar system today. MESSENGER, which has orbited Mercury for four years, finally ran out of fuel and crashed into the planet at 17:26 UT on Thursday, April 30, 2015.

New Horizons sees surface features on Pluto, begins raw image release

Posted 2015/04/29 08:06 CDT | 7 comments

Today the New Horizons team released a new animation of images taken on approach to Pluto. The animation clearly shows how Pluto wobbles around the Pluto-Charon barycenter. It also shows something more exciting to the scientists: variations in brightness across the surface of Pluto. They also began releasing raw images to the Internet.

More than 1000 Rosetta NavCam images released!

Posted 2015/04/29 11:50 CDT | 0 comment

Today the European Space Agency released a ton of NavCam images, taken as the spacecraft approached and then entered orbit at the comet.

A few gems from the latest Cassini image data release

Posted 2015/04/24 06:30 CDT | 4 comments

I checked out the latest public image release from Cassini and found an awesome panorama across Saturn's rings, as well as some pretty views looking over Titan's north pole.

Rosetta update: Two close flybys of an increasingly active comet

Posted 2015/04/21 03:07 CDT | 6 comments

In the two months since I last checked up on the Rosetta mission, the comet has heated up, displaying more and more jet activity. Rosetta completed very close flybys on February 14 and March 28, taking amazing photos. But comet dust is making navigation difficult, so the mission is now keeping a respectful distance from the comet and replanning its future path.

New views of three worlds: Ceres, Pluto, and Charon

Posted 2015/04/16 03:17 CDT | 7 comments

New Horizons took its first color photo of Pluto and Charon, while Dawn obtained a 20-frame animation looking down on the north pole of a crescent Ceres.

PROCYON update: Asteroid 2000 DP107 target selected, ion engine stopped

Posted 2015/04/13 12:15 CDT | 3 comments

PROCYON (PRoximate Object Close flYby with Optical Navigation) is a microsatellite that launched on December 3 as a secondary payload with Hayabusa 2. The mission has now selected their asteroid flyby target -- a binary asteroid named 2000 DP107 -- but is reporting a problem with their ion engines.

Older blog posts »

Latest Processed Space Images

Panorama across the lit side of Saturn's rings, May 10, 2014

Panorama across the lit side of Saturn's rings, May 10, 2014

Posted 2015/04/24 | 0 comments

Cassini scanned across the full width of Saturn's ring system, from the C ring at top, through the B ring at center, to the A ring at bottom. It took seven narrow-angle camera footprints to cover the breadth of the rings. The images are enlarged 150% from their original resolution.

Cassini looks across Titan's north pole, May 19, 2014

Cassini looks across Titan's north pole, May 19, 2014

Posted 2015/04/24 | 0 comments

In May 2014, spring had come to the north poles of Saturn and all its moons, and a hood was forming at Titan's north pole.

More pictures processed by Emily Lakdawalla »

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