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Headshot of Emily Lakdawalla

Emily Lakdawalla

Senior Editor and Planetary Evangelist

blog@planetary.org
+1-626-793-5100

Extended bio
Appearance calendar
and head shots

Emily Lakdawalla is a passionate advocate for the exploration of all of the worlds of our solar system. Through blogs, photos, videos, podcasts, print articles, Twitter, and any other medium she can put her hand to, Emily shares the adventure of space exploration with the world.

Emily holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in geology from Amherst College and a Master of Science degree in planetary geology from Brown University. She came to The Planetary Society in 2001 to oversee a portion of the Society's Red Rover Goes to Mars project, an education and public outreach program on the Mars Exploration Rover mission funded by LEGO. She has been writing and editing the Planetary Society Blog since 2005, reporting on space news, explaining planetary science, and sharing beautiful space photos. She appears weekly on the Society's Planetary Radio podcast, answering listener questions or rounding up the latest space news from the blog.

Emily has been an Administrator of the forum UnmannedSpaceflight.com since 2005, supporting a worldwide community of amateur space image processors. She is also a contributing editor to Sky & Telescope magazine.

She is now writing her first book, tentatively titled Curiosity on Mars: Design, Planning, and the First Mars Year of Operations, due out from Springer-Praxis in 2015. The book will explain the development, design, mission, and science of Curiosity with the same level of technical detail that she delivers in the Planetary Society Blog.

Emily can be reached at blog@planetary.org or @elakdawalla on Twitter.

Latest Blog Posts

LPSC 2015: MESSENGER's low-altitude campaign at Mercury

Posted 2015/03/25 07:55 CDT | 3 comments

At last week's Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, the MESSENGER team held a press briefing to share results from the recent few months of incredibly low-altitude flight over Mercury's surface. The mission will last only about five weeks more.

Prometheus, Pandora, and the braided F ring in motion

Posted 2015/03/23 05:19 CDT | 0 comment

Cassini recently took a long, high-resolution movie of the F ring, catching a view of its ringlets, clumps, and streamers, and two potato-shaped moons, Prometheus and Pandora.

LPSC 2015: First results from Dawn at Ceres: provisional place names and possible plumes

Posted 2015/03/19 06:29 CDT | 6 comments

Three talks on Tuesday at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference concerned the first results from Dawn at Ceres. Chris Russell showed a map of "quads" with provisional names on Ceres, Andreas Nathues showed that Ceres' bright spot might be an area of plume-like activity, and Francesca Zambon showed color and temperature variations across the dwarf planet.

LPSC 2015: "Bloggers, please do not blog about this talk."

Posted 2015/03/19 06:29 CDT | 4 comments

One presenter at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference asked the audience not to blog about his talk because of the embargo policy of Science and Nature. I show how this results from an incorrect interpretation of those policies. TL;DR: media reports on conference presentations do not violate Science and Nature embargo policies. Let people Tweet!

LPSC 2015: Philae at comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko

Posted 2015/03/18 04:05 CDT | 2 comments

In my first post from the 2015 Lunar and Planetary Science Conference, I discuss the latest work on Philae images, and some cometary polymers.

Adding Churyumov-Gerasimenko to my scale comparison of comets and asteroids

Posted 2015/03/13 05:47 CDT | 4 comments

Having found a color photo of the comet, I finally added Churyumov-Gerasimenko to my scale comparison of comets and asteroids visited by spacecraft.

If it's March, it must be LPSC

Posted 2015/03/13 01:09 CDT | 2 comments

Next week is the 46th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC), and Emily Lakdawalla will be attending to tweet and blog about news from Rosetta; Curiosity; MESSENGER; GRAIL; Chang'e 3; Dawn; New Horizons; Cassini; and more.

An internal ocean on Ganymede: Hooray for consistency with previous results!

Posted 2015/03/12 07:25 CDT | 8 comments

A newly published paper confirms a subsurface ocean at Ganymede. An ocean there was already suspected from its magnetic field and predicted by geophysics; new Hubble data confirms it, and even says it is in the same place we thought it was before. Such consistency is rare enough in planetary science to be worth celebration.

Older blog posts »

Latest Processed Space Images

Tethys in enhanced color: south pole and southern Ithaca Chasma

Tethys in enhanced color: south pole and southern Ithaca Chasma

Posted 2015/03/27 | 0 comments

This portrait of Tethys is made of three Cassini images taken through infrared, green, and ultraviolet filters on May 10, 2008. It includes Tethys' south pole and the southern end of Ithaca Chasma, which is on the side of Tethys that faces Saturn. On the right side of the visible disk is the huge Telemus basin, but its topography is so subtle that it is difficult to see in this view.

Prometheus and the F ring

Prometheus and the F ring

Posted 2015/03/23 | 0 comments

Prometheus orbits Saturn just inside the skinny F ring. It Saturn's most elongated known moon, being about 148 kilometers long but only 68 kilometers wide. Its periodic encroachment into the F ring creates the dark lanes visible in the inner part of the ring. This photo was taken March 15, 2015 as a part of a high-resolution movie that also included Pandora.

Pandora and the F ring

Pandora and the F ring

Posted 2015/03/23 | 0 comments

Pandora orbits Saturn just outside the F ring. It is 110 kilometers long by 62 kilometers wide. This photo was taken March 15, 2015 as a part of a high-resolution movie that also included Prometheus.

More pictures processed by Emily Lakdawalla »

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