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Alfred McEwenAugust 1, 2012

HiWishing for 3D Mars images, part III

Editor's note: this is the third of a three-part series by HiRISE principal investigator Alfred McEwen. In parts one and two, we showed you some of Alfred's favorite stereo anaglyphs. We continue with a final set in part three.

There are around 20,000 images from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter’s HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) camera are available on the University of Arizona’s HiRISE website. Hundreds of those were acquired as a result of public suggestions made using HiWish.

Many of these are actually stereo pairs, for which MRO pointed at the spot twice on different orbits and at different angles for HiRISE to image. Red-blue/green stereo anaglyphs for each of these are linked below, so get out your red-blue or red-cyan glasses.

Listed below are some of my favorite recently-acquired stereo anaglyphs, from 2011 and 2012. To really appreciate the full detail in these images you need to download the HiView tool. It takes a bit of time and effort to get this working (hint: follow the directions), but then you can quickly browse, zoom, pan, and stretch these enormous images to really appreciate their content. The HiWish user names are usually the full names of the individuals that requested the image, some of whom are planetary scientists.

Slope streaks in Pettit crater

NASA / JPL-Caltech / University of Arizona

Slope streaks in Pettit crater
Compare these images to an earlier MOC image to see new slope streaks (Editor's note: Jason Davis is working on a future article to highlight these dramatic changes). HiWish user: Norbert Schonghofer. Original HiRISE anaglyph
Possible future Mars landing site of 2018 joint rover

NASA / JPL-Caltech / University of Arizona

Possible future Mars landing site of 2018 joint rover
Looks like a wonderful site to explored layered sediments, but a bit scary for landing unless it can avoid the steep slopes. HiWish user: Monica Podrelli. Original HiRISE anaglyph
East Coprates Chasma dune fields and wall rock

NASA / JPL-Caltech / University of Arizona

East Coprates Chasma dune fields and wall rock
This anaglyph is difficult to view at full resolution because of so much elevation change. Notice the long debris flows extending all the way to the canyon floor. HiWish user: Matthew Chojnacki. Original HiRISE anaglyph
Ring and cone structures in Elysium Planitia

NASA / JPL-Caltech / University of Arizona

Ring and cone structures in Elysium Planitia
These structures may have resulted from interaction between hot lava and ground ice. HiWish user: Christopher Hamilton. Original HiRISE anaglyph

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Headshot of Alfred McEwen
Alfred McEwen

Principal Investigator for HiRISE for University of Arizona
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