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Headshot of Emily Lakdawalla

A case of the measles for Jupiter?

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla

26-11-2013 15:09 CST

Topics: pretty pictures, amateur astrophotos, amateur astronomers, optical telescopes, Jupiter

It has been a difficult couple of months for amateur astronomer Christopher Go's home country of the Philippines, which has experienced back-to-back disasters of a devastating earthquake and super-typhoon Haiyan. But Go is okay, and his skies have cleared, so he is now back to observing Jupiter. He has found Jupiter to be putting on a fun show for observers: it's sprouting little red spots "like it has a measles attack!"

Here are two views of Jupiter that Go took on successive nights, showing approximately opposite faces of the planet. The new little red spots are in the north temperate zone -- the uppermost white zone.

Jupiter on November 25, 2013

Christopher Go

Jupiter on November 25, 2013
On November 25, 2013, Jupiter appeared to amateur astronomer Christopher Go "like it has a measles attack! Red spots galore." The red storm in the south is Oval BA (the "little red spot").
Jupiter on November 24, 2013

Christopher Go

Jupiter on November 24, 2013
The Great Red Spot contains a dark red core and some vortex features. The wake behind it is very complex. Note the White Oval Z on the North Equatorial Belt. It looks like it has turned reddish.

Amateur astronomers like Go make crucial contributions to the study of outer planets, monitoring Jupiter's changeable face so that professionals can learn quickly about new weather events. Go shares all of his photos on his website here. He willingly shares his photos with people who ask his permission and credit him properly.

Jupiter's belts and zones

© 2004 Sky & Telescope; art: Don Davis

Jupiter's belts and zones
 
See other posts from November 2013

 

Or read more blog entries about: pretty pictures, amateur astrophotos, amateur astronomers, optical telescopes, Jupiter

Comments:

Bob Ware: 11/26/2013 05:08 CST

Surprising changes! What's next? Merging? Time will tell.

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