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Humans Orbiting Mars: Report on the Workshop

Humans orbiting Mars

Air Date: 04/07/2015
Run Time: 37:28

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Guests:

Topics: lunar eclipse, Cassini, Future Mission Concepts, Iapetus, human spaceflight, Planetary Radio, Mars, Saturn's moons, Saturn, conference report, Bill Nye

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A human mission to orbit Mars might be possible by 2033, and it might be accomplished at reasonable cost and with existing or nearly-ready technology. Three leaders of a recent Washington DC conference on this topic provide a report. Emily Lakdawalla has been playing with spectacular new images from Saturn. Bruce Betts and Mat Kaplan enjoyed the blood red, totally-eclipsed moon, and they also enjoy offering yet another space trivia contest as we learn What’s Up.

Bill Nye, Scott Hubbard, and John Logsdon at the Humans Orbiting Mars Workshop
Bill Nye, Scott Hubbard, and John Logsdon at the Humans Orbiting Mars Workshop
Journey to Mars

NASA

Journey to Mars
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Trivia Contest

This week's prizes are a 200-point iTelescope.net account worth $200 AND a stylish Planetary Radio t-shirt!

iTelescope.net
iTelescope.net

This week's question:

What are trans-Neptunian objects in a 2:1 orbital relationship with Neptune called? (2 orbits of Neptune, 1 orbit of the body)

To submit your answer:

Complete the contest entry form at http://planetary.org/radiocontest or write to us at planetaryradio@planetary.org no later than Tuesday, April 14th at 8am Pacific Time. Be sure to include your name and mailing address.

Last week's question:

What constellation appears on the flags of Australia and New Zealand? (Come on Southern Hemisphere patriots and fans!)

Answer:

The answer will be revealed next week.

Question from the week before:

What is the approximate latitude of the center of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot?

Answer:

The center of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot is at roughly 22 degrees south.

Comments:

No trivia contest spoilers please!

Arbitrary: 04/08/2015 08:01 CDT

I think this proposal is a "stuck in the middle" compromise after too much myopic reasoning. I'd rather land on the Moon than orbit Mars.

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