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Emily LakdawallaJune 17, 2013

Favorite space images: "Many Worlds"

For this evening's Planetary Radio Live event, Mat Kaplan asked me to do a presentation of some favorite space images. I told him that picking favorite space images is like picking favorite children; it's not possible because they're all my favorite. To narrow things down, I decided to explore a theme. In my big space images library I have a special tag that I use for when a photo contains more than one planetary body: "Many Worlds." You can view all the images in the library that have the Many Worlds tag; below is the list of photos I showed in my talk.

Dione in front of ringmoons

NASA / JPL / SSI / mosaic by Emily Lakdawalla

Dione in front of ringmoons
Cassini captured the images for this mosaic on December 12, 2011. The five images used in this mosaic were taken sequentially, and the background moons shifted positions between frames; this composition does not actually reflect a confluence of moons that happened at one distinct moment in time. From left to right, the ringmoons are Prometheus, Epimetheus, and Pandora.
Phobos and Jupiter

ESA/DLR/FU Berlin (G. Neukum)

Phobos and Jupiter
On June 1, 2001, Mars Express watched as Phobos (the inner and larger of Mars' two moons) slipped past distant Jupiter. Phobos is only 23 kilometers in diameter, while Jupiter is 142,000 kilometers across! The image has been rotated from the original so that the south pole of Phobos is down. Stickney crater takes a bite out of the moon to the left.

Read more: mission status, many worlds, Planetary Radio

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Emily Lakdawalla

Senior Editor and Planetary Evangelist for The Planetary Society
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