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Planetary RadioFebruary 21, 2018

The Eyes of a New Mars Rover: Mastcam-Z

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On This Episode
Headshot of Jim Bell
Jim Bell

Mastcam-Z Principal Investigator and President of the Board of Directors, The Planetary Society

Elsa Jensen
Elsa Jensen

Instrument Operations Manager at MSSS and Mastcam-Z Uplink Operations Lead, Malin Space Science Systems

https://cmsadmin30.convio.net/admin/item/actions/properties-new.jsp?folderID=396316890&typeID=294773478
Kjartan Kinch

Mastcam-Z Co-Investigator at the Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen

Melissa Rice
Melissa Rice

Mastcam-Z Co-Investigator and Assistant Professor of Geology at Western Washington University

Mat Kaplan attended a meeting of the science team for the zoom lens camera that will be atop the Mars 2020 rover mast. Planetary Scientist Jim Bell tells us how this new system will show us the Red Planet as we’ve never seen it before. Space is hard. Sample return is even harder, says Senior Editor Emily Lakdawalla. Bruce Betts presents Mat Kaplan with a musical Random Space Fact in this week’s What’s Up segment.

Mars 2020 rover artist's concept

NASA / JPL

Mars 2020 rover artist's concept
Artist's concept depicting NASA's Mars 2020 rover on the surface of Mars.
Mastcam-Z camera units

Mat Kaplan

Mastcam-Z camera units
Models of the twin Mastcam-Z camera units and calibration target.
Mastcam-Z Science Team

Mat Kaplan

Mastcam-Z Science Team
Mastcam-Z Principal Investigator Jim Bell flanked by members of the Science Team.
Mastcam-Z Science Team meeting

Mat Kaplan

Mastcam-Z Science Team meeting
Meeting of the Mastcam-Z Science Team at Arizona State University.
Mastcam-Z Science Team

Mat Kaplan

Mastcam-Z Science Team
Mastcam-Z Science Team studies a computer-generated cutaway of the camera.
Kjartan Kinch and a Mars 2020 Rover calibration target mockup

Mat Kaplan

Kjartan Kinch and a Mars 2020 Rover calibration target mockup
Kjartan Kinch of the Niels Bohr Institute with a mockup of the Mars 2020 Rover calibration target.
Mastcam-Z Science Team portrait

Mat Kaplan

Mastcam-Z Science Team portrait
Members of the Mastcam-Z Science Team pose for a stereo portrait taken by a system that simulates the rover camera.
Mastcam-Z Science Team member and grad students

Mat Kaplan

Mastcam-Z Science Team member and grad students
Mastcam-Z Science Team member Melissa Rice with grad students Darian Dixon (l.) and Kathleen Hoza (r.)
Jim Bell with a Martian friend

Mat Kaplan

Jim Bell with a Martian friend
Jim Bell with a Martian friend (model of Curiosity, the Mars Science Laboratory rover at ASU).

Related Links:

Trivia Contest

This week's prizes are a Planetary Society t-shirt and a 200-point iTelescope.net astronomy account.

This week's question:

What two planets in our solar system have about the same surface gravity?

To submit your answer:

Complete the contest entry form at http://planetary.org/radiocontest or write to us at [email protected] no later than Wednesday, February 21st at 8am Pacific Time. Be sure to include your name and mailing address.

Last week's question:

What was the last launch of a successful wheeled vehicle, with success defined as driving on another world?

Answer:

The answer will be revealed next week.

Question from the week before:

Time once again to play “Where in the Solar System?” Where in the solar system will you find Dingle Sinus?

Answer:

Dingle Sinus is a bay on Saturn’s moon Titan.

Listen more: Mars 2020, Mastcam-Z, mission status, podcasts and videos, Planetary Radio, explaining technology, spacecraft, explaining science, Planetary Society People

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