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A Giant Telescope and Remembering John Glenn

John Glenn in his Friendship 7 capsule orbiting Earth

Air Date: 12/13/2016
Run Time: 49:22

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Guests:

Topics: obituary, history, mission status, Planetary Radio, Mars, Curiosity (Mars Science Laboratory), optical telescopes, Bill Nye

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Space historian John Logsdon remembers American hero John Glenn. Planetary Society CEO Bill Nye was a big fan of the Friendship 7 astronaut—less so the new Star Wars movie. Then we get an update on the Giant Magellan Telescope from Patrick McCarthy. Emily Lakdawalla explains how a Martian breeze has made the Curiosity rover’s work more challenging. John Glenn is also the focus of this week’s space trivia contest.

John Glenn in his Friendship 7 capsule orbiting Earth

NASA

John Glenn in his Friendship 7 capsule orbiting Earth
John Glenn relaxes aboard ship after becoming the first American to orbit the Earth

NASA

John Glenn relaxes aboard ship after becoming the first American to orbit the Earth
Artist concept of the Giant Magellan Telescope

GMTO

Artist concept of the Giant Magellan Telescope

Related Links:

Trivia Contest

This week's prizes are a lovely Planetary Radio t-shirt, now available in both men’s and women’s styles. Also, a 200-point iTelescope.net astronomy account, and a Planetary Society rubber asteroid.

iTelescope.net
iTelescope.net

This week's question:

What famous baseball player was John Glenn’s wingman in the Korean War?

To submit your answer:

Complete the contest entry form at http://planetary.org/radiocontest or write to us at planetaryradio@planetary.org no later than Tuesday, December 20th at 8am Pacific Time. Be sure to include your name and mailing address.

Last week's question:

What did Apollo 17 Commander Gene Cernan, last person to walk on the moon, say just before he re-entered the Lunar Module to return to Earth?

Answer:

The answer will be revealed next week.

Question from the week before:

How many Soviet Venera spacecraft successfully landed on Venus? We’ll accept a fairly loose definition of success. (Within one or two.)

Answer:

Eight Venera spacecraft successfully landed on Venus, followed by two nearly identical Vega landers.

Comments:

No trivia contest spoilers please!

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