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SpaceX Set to Retry Cargo Run, Rocket Stage Landing (Updated)

Posted by Jason Davis

05-01-2015 17:14 CST

Topics: commercial spaceflight, mission status, International Space Station

Update, Jan. 9: Tuesday's launch was scrubbed due to a problem with the rocket's upper stage. The next launch attempt is set for Saturday, Jan. 10 at 4:47 a.m. EST (9:47 UTC).

Tomorrow morning, SpaceX will attempt to pick up where they left off last month, launching a Dragon spacecraft to the International Space Station and landing a used Falcon 9 rocket stage on an uncrewed spaceport in the Atlantic Ocean. 

Just don't call it a barge.

"It's an autonomous drone ship," said Hans Koenigsmann, responding sharply to my question about the landing site, in which I used the word "barge." It's not surprising SpaceX's vice president for mission assurance wants to be clear on the difference—most barges don't come equipped with thrusters, or the ability to hold a position within three meters in the middle of a stormy sea. 

SpaceX autonomous spaceport drone ship

SpaceX

SpaceX autonomous spaceport drone ship
SpaceX's autonomous spaceport drone ship is an uncrewed sea barge designed for rocket-powered landings of the Falcon 9 core stage.

The rebuke notwithstanding, Koenigsmann was mostly smiling as he answered reporters' questions during a Monday afternoon press conference at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. SpaceX's Falcon 9 and Dragon are scheduled to lift off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 6:20 a.m. EST Tuesday (11:20 UTC). Koenigsmann said the first stage recovery attempt will begin at about the time Dragon is released into its preliminary orbit.

"It's an experiment," he said, noting that it was CEO Elon Musk who gave the landing a 50 percent chance of success. Despite an air of caution, he added, "I'm going to be super excited if this works."

The primary goal of Tuesday's CRS-5 mission is to deliver more than two tons of supplies to the space station, which suffered a missed cargo delivery after the loss of an Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket last October. Dragon will be carrying about 1.8 tons of pressurized cargo. "I think that's the most we've crammed into a Dragon to date," said Mike Suffredini, NASA’s ISS Program manager.

NASA hosted two other briefings Monday to discuss the array of science and technology experiments awaiting Dragon's arrival—256 in all, according to SpaceX. One notable piece of equipment coming to the station is CATS, the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System. CATS will be mounted to the outside of the orbiting laboratory to measure the worldwide distribution of clouds and aerosols.

SpaceX has not revealed where their autonomous spaceport drone ship will sit in order to retrieve the used Falcon 9 stage. However, rocket operators must issue a Notice to Mariners advising boats how to stay away from falling rocket stages. Wayward ships wandering into these restricted zones are occasionally responsible for delaying launches.

The Notice to Mariners containing details for the prior Dec. 19 launch date includes a trapezoidal region about 200 miles off the east coast of the United States, stretching roughly from Jacksonville, Fla. to Savannah, Ga. Rockets heading to the ISS from Cape Canaveral launch on a northeastern trajectory in order to match the station's orbital inclination of 51.6 degrees.

A number of Internet discussion boards have tracked SpaceX's drone ship as it departed from Jacksonville. It is believed to be accompanied by two crewed support ships, the Go Quest and the Elsbeth III. As of Monday afternoon, both ships were holding a position within the keep-out zone. This Google Map shows one of the zones indicated in the Notice to Mariners, as well as the positions of the Go Quest and Elsbeth III. Hans Koenigsmann said the crew would be at least ten miles from the drone ship when the rocket stage landed.

Despite tomorrow's early launch time, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk is scheduled to participate in a Reddit IAmA at 9 p.m. EST. Given Musk's penchant for using social media to reveal information about his company's plans, it should be an interesting read.

 
See other posts from January 2015

 

Or read more blog entries about: commercial spaceflight, mission status, International Space Station

Comments:

Bob Ware: 01/05/2015 08:29 CST

WOW! If they pull this off ... Good Luck to SpaceX!

Mark Zambelli: 01/06/2015 04:36 CST

Fingers crossed for SpaceX and for their latest experiment... let's hope they get a good set of data that helps toward the goal of landing a booster on dry-land in the near-ish future. That day will surely mark a turning point for cheaper space exploration. Go SpaceX!

Ricardo Nuno Silva: 01/08/2015 04:11 CST

Yes, Elon Musk's IAmA interview on reddit was really great. Great read, full of updates and interesting details: http://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comments/2rgsan/i_am_elon_musk_ceocto_of_a_rocket_company_ama/ If you prefer, here's a simpler version without comments: http://interviewly.com/i/elon-musk-jan-2015-reddit

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