Help Shape the Future of Space Exploration

Join The Planetary Society Now  arrow.png

Join our eNewsletter for updates & action alerts

    Please leave this field empty
Larry Crumpler

Larry Crumpler

Dr. Larry S. Crumpler is the Research Curator of Volcanology and Space Sciences at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, as well as an Associate Professor at the University of New Mexico.

Larry has participated in many NASA planetary missions over the years, including the Viking, Pathfinder, and Mars Exploration Rover missions, and Magellan synthetic aperture radar mapping missions to Venus. Currently he is a Science Team Member on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission where he continues to play a leadership role in daily planning of Opportunity's "natural history" exploration of the surface of Mars. He is also a Science Team Member on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE). He was also a collaborator on the Mars Odyssey orbiter Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) instrument.

Larry's current research is divided between two topics: 1) young volcanic terrains in both New Mexico and Arizona, specializing in the physical processes of volcanism, particularly the relatively unstudied volcanology of late Cenozoic basaltic volcanism in New Mexico; and 2) geology of the terrestrial planets, with emphasis on planetary volcanism. His field work has focused on geologic mapping of youthful volcanic terrains and the physical volcanology of lava flows. He has spearheaded several public education efforts in regional volcanism and local geology.

Profile image credit: Albuquerque Journal

Latest Blog Posts

Field Report From Mars: Sol 3623 – April 3, 2014

Posted 2014/04/06 01:17 CDT | 0 comments

Larry Crumpler gives an update on Opportunity's current location, next long-term target, and excitingly increasing power levels.

Field Report From Mars: Sol 3572 – February 10, 2014

Posted 2014/02/25 12:49 CST | 5 comments

Opportunity is still exploring an outcrop high up on Murray Ridge as the winter solstice on Mars approaches. At this location the tilts are good, so Opportunity is getting excellent solar input on its solar panels.

Field Report From Mars: Sol 3556 – January 24, 2014

Posted 2014/02/25 12:18 CST | 0 comments

Today is the tenth anniversary of Opportunity's landing on Mars. Here at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, we just opened a tenth anniversary exhibit.

Older blog posts »

Facebook Twitter Email RSS AddThis

JOIN THE
PLANETARY SOCIETY

Our Curiosity Knows No Bounds!

Become a member of The Planetary Society and together we will create the future of space exploration.

Join Us

Fly to an Asteroid!

Travel to Bennu on the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft!

Send your name

Join the New Millennium Committee

Let’s invent the future together!

Become a Member

Connect With Us

Facebook! Twitter! Google+ and more…
Continue the conversation with our online community!