Help Shape the Future of Space Exploration

Join The Planetary Society Now Join Now!

Join our eNewsletter for updates & action alerts

   Please leave this field empty
Blogs

Amir Alexander

Early Data from Ibuki

Posted by Amir Alexander

02-06-2009 16:15 CDT

Topics:

by Amir Alexander

The Japanese Space Agency JAXA has released early data collected by the greenhouse gas monitoring satellite, Ibuki. Also known as GOSAT, Ibuki was launched on January 23 to measure carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere around the globe. The mission was designed to complement NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO), which was launched on February 23 but failed to reach orbit. With OCO's loss, Ibuki will take on a much greater role in monitoring the main greenhouse gas generated by humans in the coming years.

The Ibuki data presented by JAXA is only preliminary, since the instruments on board the spacecraft are still being calibrated. In fact, the released data was collected on April 20 -- 28 as part of the calibration process. Even so, Ibuki's preliminary mapping of carbon dioxide distributions can provide a broad outline of the accurate data that canbe expected from the spacecraft down the road.

Ibuki's carbon dioxide map

Ibuki's carbon dioxide map

he first mapping of the global distribution of carbon dioxided by the Japanese spacecraft Ibuki, also known as GOSAT. The data was gathered between April 20 -28 while the spacecraft was callibrating its instruments.

s expected, the Ibuki's map shows higher distributions of carbon dioxide in the northern hemisphere than in the southern hemisphere. This is consistent with the fact that most major industrial and population centers are located in the northern hemisphere. The map also shows particularly high concentrations in northern China and, surprisingly, in central Africa. Mission controllers attribute this result to interference by local dust storms, and are working to solve the problem so as to produce accurate measurements in the future. Ibuki also collected data on the global distribution of methane, showing similar patterns to those of carbon dioxide.

 
See other posts from June 2009

 

Or read more blog entries about:

Facebook Twitter Email RSS AddThis

Blog Search

JOIN THE
PLANETARY SOCIETY

Our Curiosity Knows No Bounds!

Become a member of The Planetary Society and together we will create the future of space exploration.

Join Us

Featured Images

Hubble's view of Mars during the Comet Siding Spring flyby

Mars from Hubble STIS, April 26, 2012
Hubble's view of Mars on October 19, 2014 (color)
Mars as viewed by Hubble ACS/SBC, May 30, 2014
More Images

Featured Video

View Larger »

Space in Images

Pretty pictures and
awe-inspiring science.

See More

Join the New Millennium Committee

Let’s invent the future together!

Become a Member

Connect With Us

Facebook! Twitter! Google+ and more…
Continue the conversation with our online community!