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Justin FoleyJune 15, 2019

LightSail 2 Launch Viewing: Tips & Tricks

There is nothing quite like seeing a rocket launch up close and personal. How do you do it?

LightSail 2 is launching on the next SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. It is one payload of many on the mission known collectively as STP-2. The U.S. Air Force’s Space Test Program (STP) develops and tests advanced technologies in space.

Launch Pad & Viewing Locations

SpaceX's Falcon Heavy will lift off from Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center. If you keep your eyes to the sky, you'll see the boosters re-enter the atmosphere and land several minutes after launch at Landing Zone 1 & 2 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (see map below).

The easiest way for Planetary Society members to get a guaranteed viewing spot is via the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex using one of two strategies.

  1. For viewing from the most preferred location at the Saturn V Center (which is likely to sell out in less than 24 hours), visit The Planetary Society's Launch Events page and purchase from a reserved block of tickets. Note: the Society ticket price will be the same as the general public price. Because the number of tickets that the Society holds is still limited, they may also sell out quickly.
  2. For less preferred but still very good locations, go through the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex and purchase tickets. These will also sell out fast.

If you happen to miss ticket sales, the following map produced by Supercluster provides the best locations for public viewing of the launch. Download the PDF or click to enlarge the image.

Kennedy Space Center launch viewing map

SUPERCLUSTER.com

Kennedy Space Center launch viewing map

Staying Informed

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Photography/Videography

Falcon Heavy rocket launch

Ryan Chylinski / Spaceflight Insider

Falcon Heavy rocket launch
A closeup of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket which launched on February 6, 2018 from Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, FL from the historic launchpad, 39A.

Other Tips

Read more: commercial spaceflight, Planetary Society Projects, mission status, events and announcements, spacecraft, LightSail, Planetary Society People, Planetary Society

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Justin Foley
Justin Foley

Systems Engineer for NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Read more articles by Justin Foley

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