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Headshot of Emily Lakdawalla

Popping down to LPSC

Posted by Emily Lakdawalla

06-03-2008 11:06 CST


So in a couple of hours I will be off to Texas for a week, visiting family and then abandoning the baby with her aunt for one crazy day spent popping down to Houston to the 39th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. Held every year, the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference is a meeting of a couple thousand planetary scientists, mostly geologists of one type or another, meaning that the conference is mostly about terrestrial planets, icy moons, asteroids, and meteorites. The conference runs for a week, with a packed schedule in each of four conference rooms, where individual scientists get up to speak for 10 or 15 minutes apiece about their latest research; twice during the week there are large poster sessions, Science Fair-type displays of research on 1.5-by-1.5-meter posters. Here's the full program with links to all the abstracts. LPSC abstracts are longer than most, two printed pages, often with illustrations, and they can be very informative.

Are you attending LPSC?
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lease send me an email to volunteer!

missed the meeting last year because of Her Majesty and she will only allow me to go to one day of it this year, so I selected Monday, March 10, which is when the MESSENGER mission will be presenting their first results from the January flyby of Mercury, both in the morning and in the afternoon; and then there is a concurrent session (in the afternoon anyway) on the first results from the Kaguya mission to the Moon. Between now and then I am going to have to figure out how to be in two places at once.

Because I'll be traveling, and traveling takes me away from Anahita's babysitter, my posting schedule will be very spotty for the next week or so, but I'll do my best to keep up with the news.

See other posts from March 2008


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